NY NOW Podcast

The Paper Plane Cocktail Hour: I would fly Spirit Airlines for you

October 14, 2021 NY NOW Season 1 Episode 55
NY NOW Podcast
The Paper Plane Cocktail Hour: I would fly Spirit Airlines for you
Show Notes Transcript

When you discover a maker with a name like Kaleidadope, you just sense that it’s going to be an invigorating ride! Fresh from her booth on the Summer NY NOW show floor, Krystal Banner doesn’t disappoint as she opens up to Amy and Sarah about the role Color + Culture play in her on-the-rise brand. 

RESOURCES   
| Guest
Website:   
https://kaleidadope.com/

| NY NOW :   
https://nynow.com     

| NY NOW Podcast Page:   
https://nynow.com/podcast     

| NY NOW Digital Market:   
https://nynowdigitalmarket.com    

Amy Loewenberg:

Hi, everyone, and welcome to the paper playing cocktail hour. I'm one of your hosts Amy lowenberg relations and partnership development manager at New York now, I treasure the relationships I've established and I relish in the new ones that I make every day, sharing information introducing our amazing community of retailers, buyers, artists, makers and brands through my spotlight podcast in New York now, and my store tour is on Instagram.

Sarah Schwartz:

And I am your co host, Sarah, you may know me as the founding editor and editor in chief of stationary trends magazine, my site, the paper nerd or possibly my other podcast, the paper fold. I've been covering the stationery and gift industry since 1997. But never did I imagined that I'd one day be covering the market here in the virtual space.

Amy Loewenberg:

So throughout 2021, we'll be raising our glasses alongside our pencils, as we share stories, compare notes, and celebrate three of our all time favorite topics, stationery connection, and cocktails. So you know, Sarah, I was looking at your card wall on the paper the other day, and I just wanted to comment on how I really like what you're doing with this and how you're growing this with all the new cards that you're loving these days and sharing them with us.

Sarah Schwartz:

Well, thank you, Amy, that is so nice of you to say I, I started the feature during the height of lockdown when I was really, really missing going to stores and seeing physical card walls, I may or may not have been looking at certain individual store visits and suffering from an extreme case of FOMO. At any rate, I decided it would be really fun to assemble my own virtual Cardwell and just direct traffic from that page to the maker site. It it also really helps me remember the name of a new maker that makes a big impression on me and immediately spotlight their work in my community.

Amy Loewenberg:

It's really an amazing and very generous I think offer that you're presenting as well just to have them go directly to the maker site. But what I think is it's just so much fun to see how your humor is shared through some of these cards. You know, I know you pretty well. I can almost hear you saying some of these covers to me. So I think it's a pretty magical moment when we're standing in front of a card wall because we all have these visceral reactions to something that we read or an impression made on us from an image.

Sarah Schwartz:

Absolutely. And I think it's abundantly clear that every card I feature I would send to someone myself and I get really excited when I remember a favorite maker and put them on my wall like I put ashcan on there a couple of weeks ago and I was dying, I was having a really really hard time just picking one card from his amazing range. Which makes me question why I don't have a card up there yet from our guest today. I know I'm gonna have to change that. Hopefully by the time this episode airs, I will have one up there. But in the meantime, why don't you spell who we're having for drinks today?

Amy Loewenberg:

Absolutely. Today we're talking with the amazing and the enchanting Krystal Banner, an experienced artist and creator who's passionate about using color and culture to create products that are accessible and relatable. After spending over 10 years as an engineer and consultant Krystal decided to pursue her passion for art, she saw an opportunity to use your creativity and to make stationery more inclusive, inviting a broader audience to connect and feel seen.

Sarah Schwartz:

I love it and Krystal actually founded her brand Kaleidadope in 2017. It's been recognized in multiple publications. She is also a published author and creator of a range of original card decks and gifts. So I first got acquainted with her work pre COVID, just prior to her emerging, exhibiting in emerging designers at NY NOW in February 2020. I was I was totally smitten with her work then and it's gone to a really interesting place these days. So I'm really eager to start

Amy Loewenberg:

this conversation. Alright, so let's dive in. Hi, Krystal,

Sarah Schwartz:

thank you so much for being here.

Krystal Banner:

Of course, of course I'm happy to be here.

Sarah Schwartz:

So I first saw you at New York now in 2020. I can imagine that being a black person period in 20 20 was incredibly hard to be a black maker, just starting a brand must have been quite an interesting experience. Now your identity as a black woman was always quite evident and remains evident in your work. But how do you think your voice has changed?

Krystal Banner:

That's a good question. It's funny because I think I wouldn't say my voice has changed, but I feel like my stance is almost like interpreted in a way like, Oh, I see that now. So the reason I started Kaleidoscope was I noticed a lack of diversity, and stationary in general. And this was something that was like, you know, I see this, so I'm an artist. So I see this in the art world as well. So I'd be in as my former life as an engineer, I would be in museums in Europe. And, you know, I'd go to all these museums and just art in general was not as diverse as I know, art to be just being passionate about art and studying different styles of art, when I was younger, so I was like, you know, this is a thing in multiple areas. So I want to kind of inject my own style of art and my sense of humor, which is a big thing for me. And it's also a way that I deal with things like last year, I mean, when it's appropriate, but sometimes, you know, you have to laugh to keep from crying sometimes. So injecting that humor in a way that makes people like, you know, it's true, because it's, it's funny, because it's true. And that sense, and just showing that, you know, diversity is not scary, it should be something that we all welcome because it can inject some creativity, a new perspective, a new way of thinking that maybe wasn't there before that everybody would benefit from and appreciate. So since I started Kaleidoscope as a way to increase our presentation, I mean, my voice has really remained the same, but I think people are starting to see like, Oh my gosh, like I can actually see it now. Like I can see that, you know, we don't have diversity, or there are areas where people are underrepresented. And we can do something to improve that like that can be fixed. It's not just something because there aren't any talented, diverse people. And that's one of the things that I really stand on is I don't want people to support me just because I'm a black woman support me because my stuff is awesome, are you you resonate with it, and you think it's cool. Um, and so that's the kind of the dual sword like, yes, I do want to be representative, I want the same opportunities, but I don't want people to just say, Oh, she's black, let's just buy a few things. Right. And that's, and that's one of the things that I really stand on, I really want people to resonate with my work because I'm talented, and because they see, I care about what I do. And I I put quality and you know, time and effort and care into into my product. So that's what I would say about that, I think last year was just, it was hard, just being a maker and being a creator and a business person. Because you're processing all these feelings, right? I've worked to do you still have you know, orders to do until you have to talk to people. And it was so ironic because last year was the biggest year for my company. And it's like, you can celebrate but people are dying and not just from you know, all the racial things that were going on but from COVID so it was it was a strange dichotomy of like doing well my business is doing well and getting recognition but and I'm an empath so it's like you know, you see people hurting and you know, it's just it was very interesting to process and it's funny because I I use that art in a way and I created a deck it's called 2020 visions Tarot and it was me drawing through the pain The, the, you know, the alien, you know, us finding out that they have an alien task or like all these crazy things that just is this real life so that was the way I coped and that was the way I processed a lot of what was going on was through my art and through sharing that and sharing everything that was going on but all of it is pretty much what I started Kaleidoscope like the purpose of me starting Kaleidoscope so I just feel like it was it brought attention to the reasons why it was created in the first place.

Sarah Schwartz:

Wow I mean it sounds like you know, you started Kaleidoscope at the perfect time because then even aside from a business venture it's like helps you process things the you know the way that any maker does with their art. I mean last June I started getting I started seeing getting a few emails just like from like sales reps and retailers and there was like kind of a note of panic like I need to get some black ranges in my store and you know that kind of made me It made me have a few feelings I mean one like okay great this is I'm so glad you are feeling that like awesome but on the other hand it's like well just make sure that you know these are ranges that speak to your customers and that are are good I mean there's good makers and less good makers in every shape and size exactly and that and the but the beautiful thing is that you know you helped facilitate you know all these very personal exchanges during a very difficult time and you know, that's what we're all working towards and so that you were able to create all this and become part of this sort of huge stationary conversation that you know has been occurring privately over the past you know, year and a half or so is a beautiful thing

Amy Loewenberg:

Yeah. I mean I'm I really like how you said you said it's like a duel sword that on one hand just being recognized who you are versus what you're doing they should be working together and I and that's what I hear you saying that's that's what we're all saying. But these times have created a spotlight on both aspects of the sword and so how do we honor both sides but then just work forward and honor and as Sarah said, you know, we we certainly don't want somebody to fill a hole just because that hole is there, it has to be the right person on the right voice for whatever the brand messaging is, but like your voice and your messaging resonates with so many It is beautiful to see that this was therapeutic for you because your work is therapeutic for other people as well. So I will say who you are and what you do is a beautiful combination Krystal. Thank you

Unknown:

and it's so funny and it's rewarding when I hear people of all backgrounds say you know, yeah, I like your stuff just because it's cool, it's fresh, if you will. And even though I'm passionate about representation Like I said, I believe everybody would benefit from this it's not something that I feel like you know, I want to show people you know, I am black and that is part of my identity and experience I can't you know, not mention that or erase that but at the same time I want people other people to say oh my gosh, like I'm not black but I get that like I resonate with that that's you know, so it's not just the thing of and that's like that weird sense of a lot of companies and I had a lot of companies reach out to me and it's one of those things like I get why this is happening and this needs to happen but make sure it's being done for the right reasons and I always say within even when I create I want to make sure I'm creating something because I'm passionate about not because it's trendy or the selling really hot right now I have to remain to my authenticity like to my authentic self because you start to lose lose your core audience you lose yourself in it trying to jump to the one trend to the next it moves too fast especially especially if it's like you're moving all the time so you really can't just try to jump on every bandwagon you have to know your wheelhouse is sticking to your wheelhouse yeah people will jump on trust that the right people will jump on and that's worked really well for me and I and that's where I'm that's my lane and and I think my my experience with creating decks with which are affirmations and you know, kind of a spiritual side just makes me very confident and like, Okay, this is who I am like, I'm confident in my talent I'm confident in my abilities and the people that resonate with it will and the people that won't right and there's other makers that have different styles

Amy Loewenberg:

well let let let's go down that path a little bit because that kind of leads into the question I have First of all, it is clear that you know your lane you know your brand, which is integrity, like integrity, what's the word?

Krystal Banner:

integrity,

Amy Loewenberg:

integrity goal All right, well clearly language is not my forte we leave that for Sarah.

Sarah Schwartz:

No, no, no I mispronounce words all the time.

Amy Loewenberg:

I don't know we might edit this part out but but that being said, we you know, you clearly know who you are and what your voice is and, and moving out and congratulations, by the way for being one of New York Nows emerging brand finalists.

Unknown:

Thank you. So happy to have Yes, that was exciting.

Amy Loewenberg:

Um, so your focus is to create interest in art through representation of relatable themes. And consumer shopping and behavior has changed and we're talking about that a little bit. You've clearly made adjustments. I've seen this on your website, you have free downloadable items that are in categories that have been major have had major attention and growth especially over the past 18 months. You should Your affirmations which we just spoke about, and music coloring and you have this amazing free EU good card. So what are you seeing as areas or categories that you might develop more? Or are there new ones that you might move into for 2022?

Unknown:

So I've noticed that it's, it's like a perfect storm, like I've noticed people are gravitating towards things that maybe they weren't before pandemic. So if just cards in general, more people are sending cards, more people are realizing that connection, that power of connection. And I joke I have notepads, and I made the notepads because I take notes on my phone all the time. But when my phone dies, I can't do that anymore. So paper is not going anywhere. You know what I mean? So I think we're going into this very technological or we are in this very technological age, but people are realizing like there's still power and old school forms of communication, and things of that nature. So I think for me, it's making people aware, like, this isn't just a kind of an old school way of communicating, which is why my cards with like, the modern themes, and having these downloadable things, and my reason for that was because people were going through it and people were really asking questions, like, you know, what is? Am I happy right now, like people are at home, they have time to contemplate things that normally you know, the day to day, hustle and bustle you don't even consider or ponder. So when people are we're thinking about that it's it's so funny, because I feel like the products and the things that they were resonating to were products that crystal banner, as was was creating for her own wellness and the self discovery and making those available and actually letting people have access to it and understand it in a way that isn't over their head has been beneficial. And just me talking about affirmations and what affirmations mean for me has been been huge. And even some of my cards are affirmations just say I think you're dope like that is so basic, and what is an affirmation? And it's something that as I was starting my business, I created an affirmation that because I'm like, I'm leaving my career as an engineer. So it's not like I'm struggling, it's not like I don't like it, I'm not good at it. It's, I feel like it's a lot easier leaving something that is not fulfilling you that you're not happy. I was happy and I was making good money. So it's like, what am I really doing these affirmations following your dreams man, for me to like, boost myself up and tell him like you can do this, like you're talented. Like there's enough time in the day you can get this done. But all of that stemmed from me pushing myself to get to this new level. So anything I do, whether it's cards, whether it's decks is to affect somebody is to make somebody laugh, celebrate a precious moment, have somebody believe in themselves have somebody like, you know, oh, no, boost themselves up, whatever, like, make somebody smile, because it reminds them of something when they were a kid or there's nostalgia there, all of that is really the it's all kind of I call it my work like a Trojan horse. Like it's pretty. But when you look deeper, there's a mean there's there's depth, and there's meaning and there's me and I really want people to feel better or feel connected with my work. So I think how I'm thinking about going about it is creating things in that continuing to create things in that in that realm where people are realizing like, you know, cars aren't just something antiquated, I don't do anymore, because I see these relatable themes that are happening now. So I want to send this to somebody because I get that and resonate with it. And the same thing with with cards and decks is just something that I started out doing. But I'm going to continue doing that because I see how people react to it and how people it affects people and that's what I do for myself like I create everything that I've created has been for crystal first especially the decks and when I'm creating cards, I'm just cracking up like I'm like a comedian to my own mind. Like I'm just backing up in myself as I'm making this and like I hope people find this funny I do. And even if people don't like I still think it's funny, funny card. I just I really have a ball with what I do. And that's really what I'm encouraging people to introduce in their own lives is like, really enjoy whatever it is you decide to do and whatever you're doing, like be in that present moment. Um, whether it's it's you know, and that's why a lot of my cards and products stem to be more on the you know, up Lifting like jokes aside, I have a couple cars that are like thinking of you and all of that. But you know, you got to know your lane. And with my personality, like I don't take myself too serious, but there are times to be serious, right? Oh, it's like knowing that but knowing your brand and knowing what lane you're in, so I that's kind of like how I plan to continue going forward, because it's working now. And with everything going on, I see people resonating more with that. So what

Amy Loewenberg:

I hear is that there are categories that you stay with them, but it really is not necessarily the actual product, but really more of the impact that the product makes.

Unknown:

Absolutely, yeah, absolutely. And that's because I had some people ask about my instance, because I created an instance recently, and I started getting into it. But as a kid, I always thought it was like, overwhelming and a bit like disruptive like, oh my god that's really strong. And I realized when I was getting into instance, I would want certain sense with a mood. So I would, I would want to feel relaxed or like, I want to smell something that makes me happy. Or I want to smell something that makes me feel fancy. So I started curating these incidents, and it all relates back to what you just said, how it makes somebody feel. So I have an instance called be happy. And then since called at the museum, because it feels like I'm fancy and cultured and you know, like so all of these things, really, they have the same what we used to call in my corporate america job like noble goal, which is like what, what do you what is your goal here? Like, all your actions are fine, but what is the the noble goal of what you're doing? So

Sarah Schwartz:

that's awesome. Well, I think, you know, you come from you're making, you're approaching your output on from an authentic place. And so if it resonates with you, it's going to resonate with other people. And I think you're taking the right approach. I mean, it's important to know what trends are going on, can you create something for every trend? No. Does every transcript to you know, to you know, don't?

Amy Loewenberg:

And you know what? Yeah,

Sarah Schwartz:

yeah. And I think and I think, I think the modern consumer just sort of like hasn't very good part of my French, like, sort of BS meter, like they can kind of is that French sir? Like, they can tell when something's authentic? And yeah, you know, and something is just sort of like being created because they feel like it should be created.

Amy Loewenberg:

Well, like we were talking about before just filling a space, whether it's a product or a person, like why are we just filling a space because it's there, you have to fill it right?

Unknown:

Right. And some of my most popular cards are based on trends. So it's not the fact that it's a trend, it's the fact that people just jumping on something just because oh my gosh, that's selling, I need to do that because that is going to make me some money. And I feel like Like you said, people can see through that like one of my best selling cards is my finest alcohol card. And it was made from my sister having to cancel all of her birthday plans and she's an Aries and an extrovert. So she was ready to go. And everything got shut down. And she was so sad. And I just want to make her laugh. So I created the only the finest alcohol for your birthday, with the hand sanitizer, because that's when I couldn't find it anywhere. And so we were trying to like scout slicks scoured on hand sanitizer. And, um, you know, to this day, I don't know how many 1000s of that card I sold, but it's it came from an authentic place. And you know, after that, it's just like, Oh, I need to create cards for this, because people are really going through things. And they want to reflect the times with that. So it's just, like you said, I think, you know, it's people look for the trends. And that's important. But make sure like, it's you have a connection to it, because I feel like people can tell people and that's why nobody knows I'm an introvert, because I get so excited about what I what I do. And I'm like, oh, you're just like, I'm like, No, I'm just really passionate. And I really do I get excited about talking about all the things that I have going on with kaleidoscope.

Amy Loewenberg:

Well collided dope is dope, even the name man. And it completely embodies who you are. I mean, after just talking with you for these few minutes, you know, and just just, you know, what is a kaleidoscope? You know, it's something that just really is a myriad of colors and reflection and, and it takes you to another place, and it's creativity and it's art and, you know, and it's kind of dope and I hear you humor in everything that you do. Pulling in what is trendy, or on trend right now is something that we all have to do. But the real skill is doing it as you just said under your own voice. So it's not something you're pulling in for the sake of pulling it in, but that you are communicating with others in your voice and they learn to trust you So when you throw them a loop, and you're like, Well, you know, that doesn't look like crystals card, you know, we can all stand back and see that and you said that too. So, you know what, what you say? Yeah, so

Sarah Schwartz:

um, alright, we always finish by asking, we've kind of modified this question a little bit. It used to be COVID related. Now we're not saying the C word, I guess. We're not saying it. But we need a drumroll. So I'm Crystal, how have the events of the 80s of the past 18 months or so changed how you see stationery and? And then how do you think the category will continue to evolve in consumer perception?

Unknown:

I think stationery is going through like a growing phase. Just being away almost like being a lot of things being brought to the surface, because like you said, I think conversations were being had. And if you go to a show, it's noticeable. And so you know, I'm there, I can count how many other black makers I've seen. And just talking to people and it's, it's not something that is just there aren't a lot of black makers out there, or they're just, you know, they're, they don't know what to do, I just think it's due to history, it's just been this way, it's been the same way. And I see that changing every kind of show I go, or the more people I've talked to, I see that changing. And I think it's growing in a very positive way. And one of the things that I see happening also is willing to have difficult conversations or uncomfortable as an uncomfortable conversation sometimes. But I believe that's the only way to grow. And I'm since I come from this world of corporate America. And also I'm into the spirituality community where it's a lot of like, facing the shadow side, we have to, you know, shine the light on it to see what's wrong. So we can fix it, you can't fix it if it's hidden in the dark. And it's one of those things where the last 18 months has almost been like a master course in like pushing this stuff to the forefront where it can't be hidden anymore. You can't act like it doesn't exist anymore, because it's difficult to talk about, or, you know, it might step on some people's toes. Well, I mean, that's life, right? Like, we all have these conversations in our family, with significant others, with friends with kids, whatever. So this is I feel like part of the growing stage and realizing where improvements can be made or listening to the people who are affected, and trying to work together to implement change. Because like I said before, I think everybody benefits from change, especially when it involves improving improving access, increasing diversity, visibility, opportunities, and things of that nature. So I just I think it's just a weird time of uncomfortable growth, but in a positive way. And people always look at like Crucial Conversations or uncomfortable growth as a bad thing. I don't see it as that I see it as beneficial and necessary to growth on all sides. So yeah,

Amy Loewenberg:

I think it's kind of cool. When people are pushed a little bit out of their comfort zone, you begin to have different conversations you learn you hear, you know, I mean, I just know that, you know, adding more available resources to any community that has been lacking is far past due. And that the more diverse our voices are, collectively, the better we all are, in the end, whether it is in our business, or in our personal visions and views. So right, yeah, I agree with you. This has definitely been a very evolutionary time. And and I'm glad that people were uncomfortable because there's been good growth.

Sarah Schwartz:

Yeah, I love how shaundra refers to teachable moments. Yeah, you know, the way she introduced the concept to me was, you know, here's a woman who had this amazing store in Chicago, and obviously, it's no longer open. But when it was open, you know, she relayed the experience of, you know, having individuals enter the store and ask to speak to the owner, you know, assuming it wasn't her and her saying, No, you're looking at her, you know, and she would always, I mean, there's a lot of ways you could have responded and she always chose the gracious path and you know, and called it a teachable moment so that we can all grow and I just think, I love how I love how she approaches it. And you know that certainly there are plenty of conversations that need to be had in this domain there's a lot that needs to be had in other domains socially I mean there's just so there's I do feel like we're you know, kind of at the foot of a lot of social change and you know, any way that we can kind of like expand people's horizons and maybe see things from a different perspective is you know, for the benefit of us all

Unknown:

I agree and I think just bringing to the forefront and like unconscious bias like for example if a buyer walks by and they have no experience talking to anybody other than what they're comfortable with, they only interact with a certain group of people and that's all they feel comfortable with. They might not stop and talk to me not because they don't like my stuff or a level of comfort so that is an unconscious bias that will in turn affect me and my business just based off of that like i've you know, I don't really talk to people or I don't feel comfortable or so it's it's a level of conversation that when you really look at it, it can affect so many different things just due to a bias or just being uncomfortable or just how you think about you know, what people will resonate with or what people won't so it's it's just been interesting having these conversations throughout the last 18 months but what I see is an awareness that maybe wasn't there before and opportunity to have conversations and just kind of a door opening for people to be seen that maybe before weren't able to be seen and the thing about being seen and why being visible is so important. If you're not visible to all people can't decide whether they like you or not like you just don't exist so being visible allows you to be seen and then people can make that decision and that's why I said like you know wanting people to be interested in my work because they like it like don't just buy for me because I'm there and it's like the first black person you see like visible is important to see like oh this person actually exists I didn't know this brand existed at all i love it or oh my god this brand is awesome I had people come up to me and be like oh my god I love your brand. But my clientele would just not get it and I'm like oh I completely understand but just that recognition that oh my god this is so cool. I didn't know you there was a brand like this I'll keep that in mind that is that is huge and that is fulfilling you know even if somebody says like, my my people won't get it but I see what you're doing and I think it's cool.

Amy Loewenberg:

Well, I'm like scanning through your cards as we talk right? To tell you like your car that says you probably thought you would feel like an adult by now

Unknown:

spotting me myself every day like but I know what I'm doing I'm like

Amy Loewenberg:

I'll just do my best where I get you my cards. My tables will be for your products.

Sarah Schwartz:

I know I love that I would fly Spirit Airlines

Unknown:

one of my best sellers and the funny thing about that card is I kid you not every three months another story comes out that just makes my card even more relevant like it's never gonna die like every three months I promise you somebody sends me an article they're like oh my god your card is just on my gift

Sarah Schwartz:

Yeah, that's really funny. Yeah, well you know you need to find someone who can fly who would fly Spirit Airlines for you but I mean that's

Unknown:

love or insanity like that dedication or insanity. They say

Sarah Schwartz:

they need to sell it on their site.

Krystal Banner:

That would be that would be really

Amy Loewenberg:

smart. Calling out to everybody who's listening right now if anybody has an end with spirit call me. Oh my gosh,

Sarah Schwartz:

we even put it on their luggage tags when

Unknown:

like when you you know you don't take yourself too seriously, that might be a good marketing move for them. Mommy's here.

Amy Loewenberg:

Sarah, and I just really loved the product development aspect. So everybody who he talks to constantly trying to do the next best thing.

Sarah Schwartz:

suggestions that may or may not bear fruit.

Amy Loewenberg:

Well listen, this has been more than enjoyable. And we thank you so much for taking the time with us. And we're again doing the call out to everybody who listens to check you out. And so how can people check you out? And how can they reach you? Yeah, so

Unknown:

people can find me online at Kaleidadope.com and I ll spell it's k a l e i d a d o p e .com, the same on nstagram at kaleidadope. I'm al o on Etsy, same kaleidadope. S those are the main ways you c n reach me. You can also rea h me on my personal Instagr m page, which is at Krystal, d t banner, and all my you know, email and information is there. So definitely check me ut, reach out if you have any uestions, let me know.

Amy Loewenberg:

Perfect. With that, we will say thank you so much for taking this time with us. And we look forward to what you create and what you grow. And we are your fans. And thank you

Sarah Schwartz:

so much. Oh, I'm sorry to interrupt you at a trade show?

Unknown:

Yes, yes, I'm trying to get it all, like, organized. And there's so much going on. Like, you know, q4 is crazy with the holiday season. So it's just like, managing everything, but that I hope to reunite with you to again at a trade show coming soon. We can you know, have some more last. Okay. Well,

Amy Loewenberg:

I mean, just just saying they're there. There's one every February and August that I know. I think there's a new one actually on the west coast in April.

Sarah Schwartz:

Just get your mom. Oh, yeah.

Unknown:

Bring your mom. Oh my gosh, she had such a blast. She was just I was like, Mom, you're like, my number one. salesperson. She was like, you know, so funny because you don't see your parents and that, you know, they see you and your element. And I'm like, oh, wow, you're like, you're like going out and talking to people. And she's like, I'll take that order. Oh, look at you. Yeah, she was just a joy. ball of energy. And I was like, Oh, my goodness.

Amy Loewenberg:

Okay, well, we all need one of us. That's

Unknown:

right, right. I'm just I parent food so and love.

Sarah Schwartz:

Well, you'll have to let us know if she's available.

Unknown:

I will. I will. I might have to book her. You know, she's a commodity these days. So I will let you guys know.

Amy Loewenberg:

All right, Crystal, thank you so much.

Unknown:

Thank you guys. Have an awesome rest of the day. You too. All right. Hi, bye.

Sarah Schwartz:

Well, clearly, none of us wanted to end that conversation with crystal. It was so much fun to talk with. I just had to jump in and interrupt her when she was trying to get out the door. That was some very bad podcast host etiquette. But I just want to see her in person again.

Amy Loewenberg:

Oh, I think she had a great time. I think it's completely okay that we didn't let her leave. And I always say regardless, keep them wanting more.

Sarah Schwartz:

Absolutely agreed. So thank you again for joining us for chat and cocktails. And don't forget to post Instagram pics of your paper plane using the hashtags. The paper plane podcast and paper plane cocktail hour. Don't miss out. And Amy, where can our listeners find you in the meantime,

Amy Loewenberg:

you can always connect with me on Instagram at Amy at New York now LinkedIn or email me at work. I always want to highlight our amazing community on my New York now spotlight podcast and feature you on my Instagram store tours. I'm available to help connect you to new and needed resources and answer any of your New York now market or digital market questions. And Sarah, How may we connect with you?

Sarah Schwartz:

Probably the best place to find me is at the paper nerd comm you can see more fabulous stationery coverage, check out my other podcast, the paper follows it and also access stationary trends, the industry's award winning design driven trade quarterly as well. It's always a pleasure for me to learn more about makers and spotlight their work, whether it is in publication blog, or podcast form. If you want to connect, I'd love to hear from you.

Amy Loewenberg:

So please don't hesitate to reach out to either of us with comments, questions, feedback, suggestions for guests are just to say hi, and introduce yourselves. So thank you all once again for joining us. And don't forget that New York now is now an online 365 sourcing and connections platform. Make sure to sign up and sign in. And definitely connect with us when you do. Thank you so much and we'll talk to you soon. Cheers.

Sarah Schwartz:

Cheers.