NY NOW Podcast

Fashion, Film and Textile Design with Kerrie Brown

September 02, 2021 NY NOW Season 1 Episode 51
NY NOW Podcast
Fashion, Film and Textile Design with Kerrie Brown
Show Notes Transcript

In celebration of New York Textile Month, we highlight Oscar nominated Set Decorator and Textile Designer Kerrie Brown. Founder Of Kerrie Brown Designs- an  award-winning worldwide textile business offering uniquely designed wallpapers, fabrics, and textiles for commercial, hospitality and residential projects. Winning the 2021 NY NOW Best New Product award and a finalist for the 2021 NY NOW Sustainable Award.

RESOURCES   
| Guest Website: 
https://www.instagram.com/kerriebrowndesigns/   
https://www.kerriebrown.com/     

| NY NOW :
https://nynow.com     

| NY NOW Podcast Page:
https://nynow.com/podcast     

| NY NOW Digital Market:
https://nynowdigitalmarket.com    

Dondrill Glover:

Welcome to the new york now podcast, a modern wholesale market for retailers and specialty buyers seeking diversity and discovery, gathering twice a year in America's design capital New York City. It's where buyers and designers on earth have refreshed and dedicated collection of eclectic lifestyle products. Hi, I'm Donald Glover, podcast host and senior producer for New York now, and today we're thrilled to kick off New York's textile month with our very special guest award winning textile designer Carrie Brown, founder of Carrie brown designs, one of New York nails most noted and stunning collections of textiles and home decor. Carrie Brown, Australia's Oscar nominee in New York now is 2021 winner of the Best New Product award and in New York knouse best sustainable product finalist. It's clear to see why Carrie brown designs are so visionary and celebrated after a glittering career as a set decorator on acclaimed international film features. Carrie brown opened her own design studio in Sydney in 2012. Now are approaching their 10th year in business with design releases every season, Carrie brown delivers bespoke textiles for major hotel groups, high end residential and commercial and retailers around the world carries award winning bold vision and cheeky sense of fun welcomes you to highly original and sophisticated designs, extensive textile selections and collaborative partnerships with interior designers with a portfolio of over 200 originals designed and manufactured in Australia. Join me in welcoming Carrie brown to New York now's podcast. Thank you for joining us today from Sydney. I know it's in the morning there and it's evening here in New York. I really appreciate you taking the time to join us to share your brand story. How are you doing this morning? Oh, good. Yeah, I've had a couple of coffees so I'm fine. Oh, yeah. Yeah, that's it. That's a perk up there. You know, we're so excited to dive into a conversation with you, there is so much to admire and celebrate about your illustrious career. Many people don't get the story. Behind the scenes, we have these beautiful designs at the digital market. And of course, all of your press. I noticed your brand several months ago when you came into ABC. And we also you want our best new product award. And I'm a textile, you know piece. I'm like, Oh, my God, I said these are so beautiful. And as we approach September for New York textile month, and I said, I have to start off this conversation with Carrie Brown. And so I am just the fact that you agreed. And we really appreciate that we can kick off textile month with talking to you. I'd love to start with your path. Where did you start in your career? And what brought you to textile design?

Kerrie Brown:

Well, I actually started my career in fashion. I started making clothes, and a friend of mine was printing the fabrics. So it's completely changed from there. So yeah, I was making clothes and that we've got a famous market here called Paddington market. So I was there. And I got picked up by a couple of department stores. And I know, I know. And they were I was actually doing sewing and that was, you know, I don't know, 20 or something. They came along and they said, Oh, you know, we'll have a couple of 100 is that cover? 100? What are you talking about? Yeah, so anyway, that's what started at all. It didn't last that long. Because they were like, Oh, can we have it in pink? I was like, no can only have been black and purple. Being you have it in pale pink. back then. No. And then so from close, a friend of mine was making a film. And she asked me to do the costumes. So I then moved from that to doing film because it was much more fun. And then from cost questions were, I mean, it was great. I loved it because it was all the textiles but I didn't enjoy dealing with the actors particularly because it was just I just wanted to do the clothes. I didn't want to get involved in all my whole personality thing. Of course. So yeah, so from from doing costume I got into sets and I loved that because the back or anything, you know, it was great. So yeah, so then I just started doing set decoration. So that was the beginning and then from set figuration and then moved into what I'm doing now. So I did that for about 30 years actually. That's

Dondrill Glover:

amazing. I you know I was going to bring up the fact that you know I have a segment here Hollywood and film sets in Sydney. You You know, developing set decoration kind of going from fashion to costume to film. And then for that you've done this for acclaimed international films, I mean, your Academy Award nominee, I have to ask you, what was that moment? For you? I mean, is it wasn't a moment of, Wow, I've made it or I can't believe it or

Kerrie Brown:

complete it. Yeah, actually, textiles has always been the passion. Even during set decoration. It was just a When can I get to do the curtains and the cushions and the wallpaper? You know, it was like, if I bought a wall film, I wouldn't want it. Because there was not much of a textile opportunity. And so it's always that then I think, when I was actually told I was working on a TV series in Sydney, with Robert Wagner. And I think, yeah, at the time, I was actually getting in trouble with the accountant for spending too much money on textiles. And someone came in and went, she's just been nominated for an Academy Award. Well, it changed the conversation. I can tell you.

Dondrill Glover:

Yeah, I would happen to think you've got your budget, right? Yeah. Did I cut my question? It was fantastic. It's amazing. When I think about your body, I mean, you worked on like mega films. I mean, Mission Impossible is one of my favorites. By the way, the classic and the new. I mean, Peter Pan, you know, the capacity. And then you I read something where you talked about a film that you worked on called the quiet American.

Kerrie Brown:

Film the work on Yeah. That about that. Yeah. And, unfortunately, just when it was about to be released, 911 happened. It was a bit of nightmare, but I really enjoy watching again and again. In Vietnam. It was Yeah, it was great. What an extraordinary experience. And,

Dondrill Glover:

you know, I said, you know, there's so much to unpack in this incredible journey of yours. And it kind of leads me to my next question. When did the passion arrive for textiles, I know that you they started in fashion and costume and you'd we've just talked about on set blowing the budget. But then when they weren't, I can't get half the budget. Was there a certain way that that textiles light in for you, and you just said, I've got to keep this with me and keep going.

Kerrie Brown:

I just think I was born loving textiles or something. I just used to lock myself away as a child making Barbie doll clothes and, you know, paying with bits of fabric, my mother made all my clothes. And then I started making all my clothes. So it was always fabrics and that sort of thing. And then working in film was just I got to travel the world. And and, and because I was doing a lot of period and fantasy films, I got to research and look at old textiles, you know, and I fell in love with that. So it was kind of, I just always loved textiles, I think. And everything I've done is just always been a means to using textiles. And getting to work and then getting paid to use textiles. And I love passion. So I've just always Yeah, it's Yeah, and so working in film was just like playing really, and you know, getting to play in a bigger toy box.

Dondrill Glover:

You know, textiles, they're really a special place for me as well. They hold so much history. There's so much female out there, right? Yeah, you can there's colors and patterns. And there's, there's you know, I hear that you love at the 19th century multimedia and graffiti. I think I read about that.

Kerrie Brown:

Yeah, right. Yeah. And they and they, I mean, especially period hipsters they have the hand of the maker with them like embroidery isn't the idea with prints I love looking at even just samples of textiles because that you know and I love the writing on them and I love you know how they were CAD you know catalogued and I love all of it

Dondrill Glover:

and you're and I know that we'll talk about it more in depth later but your assortment when I first saw it and it was kind of like a one minute clip that we had just like your brand spotlight or Yeah, I was blown away. You know, the luxury the luster the prints that the scale you know the many different textures and the way things are placed. I thought I don't know if people realize you know, how a textile printing can just change a room and make such a difference and you can go places and textiles and layers that just just thing. Everything it really it leads me kind of into my next question and talking about influence. How does your you know and does your background as a set decorator you know How does that experience impact the way you work with interior designers or design? How does that impact that? If it does?

Kerrie Brown:

Yeah, it does, I think, I think working in film for 30 years has completely influenced the way I work in textiles, because I didn't study to be a textile designer, I just made it up early. So the camera, setting a scene, an interior for film, for the camera, you need lots of layers, it's very boring, just to have like a one layer thing, you need lots of textures and lots of layers. And that's the way I work on my textiles on my designs. They're kind of digital collages. And it's like a vertical collage. So it's layered on top of each other that I blend and combined together. And I'm just not interested in a repeat pattern or anything like that all my fabrics or panels, my wallpapers and murals. So I want to tell a whole complete story. So I can artwork or something, I don't want to just do one little thing, and then repeat that. That's just so boring. I couldn't stand it. And there's enough of that anyway. So Well, yeah. That there's plenty of people who did that really well. So I don't need need to know. Yeah, I don't even want him to have textile designers work. Because it would ruin it for me. Not knowing what I'm doing. Actually, no, but

Dondrill Glover:

I feel you know, when you talk about doing all these layers, that part of your technique, I feel like it is kind of taking people through a painting and through an experience, because there's so many places to look into capture your eye and these spots. And I think that, you know, it's kind of like it's like a tapestry, I feel that you build in your design from from what I see. And I think it's amazing. So I, I would imagine, you know, when you are as original and as spontaneous and you know, you kind of take in the environment, and you're inspired by your own kind of path and what registers with you, you can't contain that with one canvas. You know, I'd love to talk about Australia and the design landscape. You know, we hear about the food and the the Opera House that a precise fan of every magazine done ahead of food, and, of course, all the handsome Australian actor is and so forth. But what is the what's the design scheme there? And you know, what's, what does that look like?

Kerrie Brown:

I've got to say, and Alex might like, with architecture and interior design, I think it's all white and minimalist, I just get them. Obviously. It's a lot of meat, I think because the light is so bright. And there's lots of kind of, you know, we're where I am anyway, I live right near Bondi Beach, and kind of ocean and that sort of thing. And, yeah, the design landscapes a bit sort of just kind of clean. And I'm kind of not typical of that at all. I don't think there's anyone doing what I do much. And I think I have a lot of European and Asian influence in my work. And it's probably the years of working in overseas reference to because I just, I'll just take anything from anywhere and use that. I mean, you know, like old images, that and influences and combine them. But I mean, Australia is also very multicultural. So I'm suppose I'm, you know, there's all that kind of influence to you, one of the things

Dondrill Glover:

that I thought about was that your designs and the way you designed and color palettes and the richness is registered so strongly in the United States, you do

Kerrie Brown:

really well in the United States that really get me and so in Europe as well, yeah, I really do, I think deciding. Yeah, yeah, very much so that anybody who loves color and textiles, loves my style. But yeah, of course,

Dondrill Glover:

it kind of leads me into my next question. You know, talking about your approach to color palettes, and what inspires a Carrie brown collection.

Kerrie Brown:

Look, it's a bit like about collecting things here, there and everywhere. So it's not I not necessarily just sitting here going, oh, what's the deluxe color of the year? couldn't care less. I don't rule out any colors. It just depends on where I'm at. And what I'm doing that often often work is inspired by conditions, you know, so someone will be doing a hotel somewhere. And so they come to me with their vision, and I'll go along their journey, which I'm really used to doing because I did that in film. And then yeah, you know, 1400s Baltimore during the raven and then To go and power, and then the next minute, you know, you ran out of space or something. So I don't I love all that I love going from one place to the other. So I can't be limited by what's in fashion, right this minute people don't live like that anyway, do that, Hey, Joe,

Dondrill Glover:

you don't rule out color. You don't rule it out, you know, my views and that, you know, just that in itself, because, you know, we have kind of been socialized in designed, particularly in the United States, where, oh, it's the season for blue, and it's huge. And so that kind of, I mean, I don't know, if you we went through an experience here. We have this thing that you can't wear white clothes after Labor Day. As someone said, Why my whatever my jeans I have to wear in August, in September, you know, please let me wear it. And when people started, you know, just breaking the rules.

Kerrie Brown:

I know it is exciting, isn't it? Come out and Lego. I mean, what was this year? juleps? I don't know, if you have Deluxe color. It was yellow and gray. And it's like, you have got to be kidding. ever want to be putting yellow and gray together? Oh my god. You know, forget about it. It's a

Dondrill Glover:

bad i mean that. Yeah, so I'm gonna remember that. I don't have any color. And that it just gives you a freedom. And also I buyers and retailers and customers who who are excited about your collection or don't know about it. That just opens up a whole nother door. It's not seasonal.

Kerrie Brown:

Yeah, exactly. Let's not Yeah, let's get over that. Yeah, let's go parents. No, no, I'm a small company. And I can work personally with people. You know, we don't have to go through layers and layers of people to get to me, it can just bring me up and speak to me. Yeah. Yeah, collaborating. Exactly. Yeah. And so if I can change a color for a designer, I will, you know that because we print to order, rather than, you know, fill up the planet with everything I think everybody should want. So we went and see what people want and how they want it. You know, why not?

Dondrill Glover:

Exactly. That's what I say. I think it's a great way. And on that strength and staying in with what people want and giving them options. Guys are increasingly more conscious and committed to sustainable practices and principles. It's, you know, now more than ever, that consciousness far has been its high interest way. And the great thing is that people are responding. What should we know about Carrie brown designs and interiors by which What should we know about those? With you?

Kerrie Brown:

Yeah, I mean, I, well, like I say I printed order, so we don't have surplus product laying around that nobody wants. Or own the old way. The old my older people, I work with a small family businesses, so they all work the same way. So I've got different printers and their small family businesses. I recycle, like even the off cuts from the cushions, that sort of thing. We recycle everything. So that's all you know, to send out to different companies to come and pick it out. And then they use it for, you know, filling toys or boxing bags or whatever. So it's all recycled. All the inks are water soluble. We try to use processes that don't use a lot of water either. Yeah, so wherever we can, I see a limit we limit waste. Everything we use should last you know you shouldn't have to be throwing it I don't want you to throw it out. That's why I think about the whole color thing. You know if you love blue, use blue for your whole

Dondrill Glover:

life. Blue. You've said so many valid and incredible points that are that are integrated into your business and your principles. But with making things the order you one of the things you said is there's no waste and that's really harmful. Because we have landfills filled and so textiles and so you know knowing their brand like yours you're not wasting and what you do have you you know you share you the way you find a way it's a life cycle. So it is really wonderful for buyers and retailers to know that you know it just makes us love the brand. Even more for us, which I'm I mean I can talk about so much more. But I am excited to dive into what we have in the digital market. I mean your collection. It is absolutely stunning. I mean your home decor portfolio is tremendous. Over 250 original designs, bold, vibrant, luxurious, I completely adore it. It can we talk about what we had here in the digital market the some of the new ones

Kerrie Brown:

Yeah, for this digital market. So there's a collection for custom me. That one that one's started from a commission again, I was commissioned to do wallpaper and textiles for a new guest house opening up in the Southern Highlands, which is sort of the country area in downtown Sydney, not far from Sydney. And it was an old family home that was probably built in 1880s. And I thought, the collection being because it was a family home, I thought, well, maybe the wallpapers because I was mainly during wallpapers for maybe the wallpapers have always been there. And how they and I thought of them as one of the family members took out a sketchbook and and, and diary and started collecting leads and plants and flowers and writing notes about them. And I sort of wanted to include ink blots, and, you know, bits, you know, stains and things like that, just from her journeys, walking around the property collecting these things over the years. So that became kind of remember which one that was, I think that was kasnia the country property or something like that, that one anyway. And then I thought I will, let's just look at all different things that the women in the House did. So there's another one that I said, well, it's an inventory of all the pots and basses and plates and bowls that she had. Oh, yeah. And so that's kind of I thought, well, that's been, you know, pasted on the wall forever. And then someone's come along and repeated over the trouble that so often, I like my papers to have been on a journey. So they've been in for a long time. And then somebody has done something on top of it. And, you know, maybe the children have pulled out a box of crayons and scribbled all over it. You know, that kind of thing. Of course. There's another one in the collection, which is called letter from Vincent. And that's kind of, I thought, well, that's the writing room or the, you know, the the library. And so there's been postcards, and people have written notes on the postcards. And so that's one of them, you know, like they've taken a picture of the fields and then written a letter on it to send to someone. So that one's letter to Vincent, to Kazmir is based was basically based on on that admission,

Dondrill Glover:

I love you going for a house like that.

Kerrie Brown:

Yeah, but I would never have thought that if a designer didn't come to me and say, I'm doing this house, and, you know, so it all evolves. So I love that when people come with their ideas, because it takes you somewhere that that you wouldn't have gotten yourself, I love that. Now, what I loved about working film, too, because you would never go there, you would never find out about that. Right? You know.

Dondrill Glover:

And, and, you know, I think that way, because just that concept along with the house, and then how you took design through it. That's pretty fantastic.

Kerrie Brown:

Yeah, and then I've got smoke and mirrors and abstract, they were kind of known together. And again, they came from a condition for a restaurant in Singapore. Now the design in the restaurant didn't turn out anything like these designs, but they sort of started on that journey. And so and then I just fell in love with the idea of one of the ideas was a kind of smoky design, the interior designer wanted, and then I just loved the idea of capturing smoke and printing it in different colors and formats, that kind of thing. So yeah, and then and then I wanted to do something more abstract. So that sort of snuck in there as an abstract came from that. So it's kind of was more sort of, you know, and then I started laying sort of sheer textiles over the top of the smoke and gotten some of those abstract landscapes. So there was sort of dreamy, and yeah, that kind of quality to them. So a lot softer than I normally do some of those. And then so sick. I just had Oh, I just wanted to do something with traditional French wallpapers from the 1800s and so I just had a ramped up the color and and like I was saying before, it was kind of like they're up on the wall. And they've been there so long. Someone's pulled out their, you know, crayons and drawn on scribble. They were kind of a bit like,

Dondrill Glover:

yeah, I'm glad you mentioned that collection, because it's like I heard about you said, Oh, it's so French. It's like I love it already.

Kerrie Brown:

Yeah, yeah, yeah. But I've always wanted and sometimes I collect things. And I can't work. They don't work straightaway, but they'll just be my you know, I'll just, that's be there. And then maybe a year or two or three later, suddenly they'll turn into a collection. Yeah, it comes there works. Yeah. And then so forest again was just I was something's things evolve in different ways. So a lot of people wanting green and forests and that sort of thing and I wanted to do something. I've got a lot of green forest. In my wallpaper collection. I just want to do something more abstract, and more painterly. So that was just playing around with that. Really,

Dondrill Glover:

I love that tip of the green because you know what I, what I found is that I think particularly during this time of being inside and you know, you know what's happening in the world, I found that being we're bringing a lot of greenery into their homes. I connect with with nature, and you have some of those before big bold prints that I feel like when I look at that I'm bringing I'm bringing it

Kerrie Brown:

outside in noon. Yeah, yeah, that's very Australian, too, because our houses are very open to the outside and stand outside the greenery is always coming into that is

Dondrill Glover:

part of this beautiful landscape. Yeah. So those are those are the ones that are available in the digital market. And that's just me what what a collection and also you just you have this vast assortment that are that buyers can can tap into. Before we go back to that I'd love to talk a little bit about your work with hotels, I mean, you have worked with, with some of the most noted luxurious hotels, unique, special hotels around the world in the States, you've designed for the Marriott Hotel, little bell of grace that that's in Charleston, coastal city in South Carolina. How does that feel and collaborating with those hotels and designers to just you know, because here you're here, you're working and collaborating, creating spaces that people from around the world visit hotels, you go in you go and you kind of gets to be your home for a while. Until you'll?

Kerrie Brown:

Yeah, it's my favorite because they can kind of go bigger and more elaborate and create spaces, like create little film sets in a way. So yeah, I love working with them designers of hotels I love that's my favorite. Because this space is a big issue. You know, we've done some great domestic interiors as well, it works well domestically, as well.

Dondrill Glover:

Yeah, yeah. And that's really special. I just have fun because you get to do more and bigger. Yeah. And people really see it because you know, you travel, you stay at a hotel. You want it to be as much like home and comfortable. But you want the beauty there's something about going into a beautiful space to welcome people. So I much admire that in you know, those collaborations and things that you've done said I have to ask, what are some of the best design elements you think that people can use to scale a room?

Kerrie Brown:

Look, it's not really my, you know, if you wanted to ask me, what's the best way to decorate a room? If you're planning a murder? I'd be fabulous. Should I decorate my room? You know? I do. I'm sort of funny. I mean, I I just design it. And let's say go use it. Have fun. Just put it there. Because I find the best things happen when you're not expecting them to happen. I don't want to tell people how to I understand it's pretty brave paper aim tries something you know, it's not good one. Yeah, get some samples and just try it because you might surprise everybody you might do something nobody's thought of. I mean, I have people coming in the store. The way we work is they say oh, I've got this lounge and you know, I like blue what students you know, that I have? I said just pull out things you love. Let's put them together and see what works because often people will choose things I wouldn't have thought of and they just look so great together. Yes, yeah, I think be open choose try and at least choose something you never would have thought you'd choose. Don't always play it safe. It's tricky. No, life's too short to be so boring. Try something Yeah.

Dondrill Glover:

I have to say if I had a choice and you know just starting and collection of Carrie brown designs, I definitely would have posted my couch with your prints. I might do one of your lampshades and I just move your wallpaper it just yeah cuz they're really really special but i but i think that that's a good way you're you know saying to people be bold try something new Don't be afraid and they're just you know this the assortment and that you have really lends itself to people grabbing on and trying something new and going there with design. It really impacts the space

Kerrie Brown:

don't Yeah, yeah. Yeah, I have people saying oh should I have all different I should have all the same and if you love the same have the same. You know, don't let someone tell you it needs to be all the same. Well, don't let someone tell you it needs to be all different. Go with something that you know that you because some people are. Everything has to be the same other can't stand it so you know you don't

Dondrill Glover:

kind of breaking the rules. On your own beat, the way you've done with design, that it's really empowering and inspiring, so much to see. And you really get to look at design and own your space in a very exciting way. Yeah. Well, you heard it, guys, Carrie Brown is giving you permission on your space. And on on the strength of that, what's a good way? How can buyers and retailers work with with Carrie Brown? How does that work?

Kerrie Brown:

Well, it's, I mean, that they can just work directly with me so and i just i like to get to know them what they want, what are their needs? You know? So it's very personal, very personal approach. Yeah, everything is made specifically for that person for that job. So they need to tell me what they are done. And or, if they don't know what they're after we can have a conversation, let's just have a conversation about what they're needing what they're thinking. Yeah. And you know, that can lead to all sorts of new things. Exactly. No, I

Dondrill Glover:

think that's, that's a good way to get into having that, because it is about building personal relationships. And, and, you know, sometimes you can see a collection and be intimidated, how does it work, but then being able to connect directly with you and figure out what's best for their store, or what they're calling for their clients. I think it's the best way. So it's a personal experience with working with Carrie brown and your source. For stores,

Kerrie Brown:

I've got a collection starting at the moment. And it's very different. I think, I have taken sort of lots of different images, historical images, some of them are graphic design, some of them are old paintings. Some of them are just tiny segments of fabric sample that has been crossed out and to not going to use this one. I love that. So I'm definitely using that one. And I've combined so they just take up a section of the design. And then the bottom is like a geometric design in some of the colors from that pattern. And then to the I haven't even gotten named to that one yet. And then block layers of different colored, geometrical kind of fabrics to go with that haven't got a wallpaper to go with that one yet. things come to me. Yeah,

Dondrill Glover:

yeah, that's what I'm thinking things kind of

Kerrie Brown:

sitting in the wings that maybe haven't come out yet. But they can suddenly come out tomorrow. In fact, my whiteboard is waiting to happen. Yeah. Um, I just arrived this morning. So we're about to start sort of photographing it and putting it together. At Christmas, when the new designs are run, that's what I love, and everyone loves it. That's big.

Dondrill Glover:

Yeah, give me something for Christmas. I think that that's wonderful. You know, on On that note, you get like four additional collections for New York now. So we are really excited about that. And, and we really appreciate it, it gives our buyers and retailers even more of your collections to choose from and to fit into the demographics of their stores, what they're looking for, for their season. So I really, it opens it up even further. So we're excited about those four additional collections that are in the digital market.

Kerrie Brown:

That we're in lockdown, we would love to have been there in person.

Dondrill Glover:

I know we want you here. I mean, I've Well, hopefully maybe in the coming year. We do know that once you are able to join us that that you have been here and we cannot wait. I can't say that enough. But also the fact that you have been available in the digital market and you joined us in this space. And you know, bringing your brand and connecting with our community. giving them access to your collection just was a great start for us. And then of course, being our 2021 I have to say it again, our best new product award winner and also a strong finalist in our sustainable award categories. So it is very easy to see why your collection you your work has been so visionary. Thank you

Kerrie Brown:

so much for having me. great talking to you. We've loved everyone from New York now that we've had contact with it's been brilliant. So we can't wait.

Dondrill Glover:

Oh, if that means some questions, we take it to heart and we will definitely be staying tuned with you. And thank you again for being part of our family and being here with us today. Miss Karen, Australia. Oh, we'll take it from Australia and we're sitting you right back. Bjork? Carrie. We'll see you soon. Thanks so much. To learn more about Carrie visit Carrie brown comm Helsel follow on Instagram Hi I'm Carrie brown designs Pinterest at Carrie brown shop and LinkedIn if Carrie brown designs. Thank you for listening to the New York now podcast. Make sure to tune in weekly for engaging and insightful conversations touching on the most relevant topics facing our community today. Is it through your mouth comm to learn more about our market and how you can join in all the conversation