NY NOW Podcast

The Paper Plane Cocktail Hour: The LOUIE Virtual Red Carpet

July 08, 2021 NY NOW Season 1 Episode 45
NY NOW Podcast
The Paper Plane Cocktail Hour: The LOUIE Virtual Red Carpet
Show Notes Transcript
  • GUESTS: 
    • Nora Weiser - Executive Director of the Greeting Card Association (GCA) 
    • Lynn M. Jones- Owner, Artist, Printer of Just my Type Letterpress
  • MODERATOR: Amy Loewenberg- Relations Manager at NY NOW & Sarah Schwartz- Editor of Stationery Trends and The Paper Nerd
  • DESCRIPTION:  Join Amy and Sarah for chat and cocktails as we count down to the LOUIE Awards, AKA the Academy Awards of the greeting card industry. Both were judges for this year’s edition, and are joined by GCA President Nora Weiser — who made that sure the show would go on, despite COVID-19’s best efforts — and Lynn M. Jones of Just My Type Letterpress. The California maker entered the awards for the first time and is a finalist in five categories!   


RESOURCES   
| Guest
Websites:   
GCA: https://www.gca.cards/       
Just My Type of Letter Press: https://justmytypeletterpress.com/     

| NY NOW :
https://nynow.com

| NY NOW Podcast Page:
https://nynow.com/podcast   

| NY NOW Digital Market:
https://nynowdigitalmarket.com   

Amy Loewenberg:

Hi, everyone, and welcome to the paper plane cocktail hour. I'm one of your hosts Amy lowenberg relations and partnership development manager at New York now, as a past buyer, I surrounded myself with everything paper at home goods oriented. And I continue to do so to this day. I treasure the relationships I've established and I relish in the new ones I make every day, sharing information, and introducing our amazing community of retailers, buyers, vendors, artists and makers through my spotlight podcast in New York now, and my store tours on Instagram,

Sarah Schwartz:

and I am your host, Sarah, you may know me as the founding editor and editor in chief of stationary trends magazine, my site, the paper nerd, or possibly my other podcast, the paper fold. I have been covering the stationery and gift industries since 1997. But never did I imagined that I'd one day be covering the market here in the virtual space.

Amy Loewenberg:

So throughout 2021 will be raising our glasses alongside our pencils. As we share stories, compare notes, and celebrate three of our all time favorite topics, stationary connection, and cocktails.

Sarah Schwartz:

Cheers. So let me be the first to welcome you to the first and hopefully the last movie virtual red carpet. Next year, please, let's do this in person. The words don't start for an hour. So we've got time for cocktails and conversation before we celebrate the winners and all that fabulous greeting card design.

Amy Loewenberg:

So we just grabbed my tiara and even though the award ceremony is a little bit different this year due to COVID-19. So it's the judging. Instead of all the judging taking place in one location as in years past, which I can only imagine to be a boatload of fun. This year, a series of hubs went up around the nation. I was in the New York hub. It was a small group of three with Fern gimble men, President and art director at designer greetings and Louis guardian angel and Kelly Bristol VP of associations and buyer engagement at brand wise and myself. It was a great day. I had so much fun. Sarah, you were in Cleveland, correct?

Sarah Schwartz:

Yep. So in years past, I have judged the Louise in both New York and Washington DC, which was a ton of fun as, as you surmise, but getting to just hop on the highway and drive to the gorgeous American Greetings headquarters on the west side of Cleveland simplified everything exponentially. All in all, it was a bit surreal for me since my last business trip prior to COVID was judging last year's Louis awards in Washington, DC. However, I cannot go any further without mentioning Marybeth Siebert, this year's Louis chair, who has worked tirelessly behind the scenes and was so welcoming with the rest of our American Greetings team. I cannot even verbalize how amazing it was to be in such an inspiring artful environment after sitting in my house for a year. Yeah. So I'm really curious to hear about your judging experience, Amy? Well, I

Amy Loewenberg:

mean, it was a great. First, I'll say that I was overjoyed to be in the greatness of two such well respected women in the industry. But even though the process was not like it was in years past, Fern did such a lovely job of organizing our meeting our card categories to make sure we were fed, she even gave us presence. I mean, who does? I know we were totally spoiled. And this was my first time judging and definitely hopefully not my last, I was able to let all my past experience just flood back all over me. You know, just to look at these all these amazing cards and my categories with a discerning eye. I viewed them as how they first made me feel. So what emotions they evoked and in an our hub in our categories, there was just such a great deal of laughter So that was that was a lot of fun. I looked at the materials, the processes, the messaging, the layout, the overall structure. You know, I believe that designers share their creativity in every aspect of their work from the thought of it to the final production and you know, to what we are placing a stamp on because the card for me doesn't just stop at the card. It's the envelope. It's what the recipient receives. I just hope that I did them all proud. I took this very Seriously as receiving a Louis is an honor. And I felt a responsibility not to just the GCA, but to all the designers putting forth their work. But the GCA created an easy judging platform. And I'm just so excited to see who takes their category. How about you, and you're very skilled Louis experience?

Sarah Schwartz:

Well, I, it was amazing, I just want to say that when I do sit down with the big piles of cards, like, I am always very aware that all of these cards are everybody's babies. And we're judging very, something very special and meaningful, to say nothing of all the emotions they've carried and sent and you know, it's a, it can be overwhelming it when you think about it. And this year, specifically, for me, it definitely was a little jarring to regard fresh batches of cards in categories. I had just judged last year, and realize how much I had changed. The cards definitely felt more meaningful and heartfelt. And I'll say, you know, while some judges are tough, I tend to give out a lot of high scores, and really focused on the positive in my comments to the makers. And judges can leave comments as they review each entry. And you know, like I said, in terms of in terms of judging, I always just assumed that each entry was slaved over by the maker and then dazzled senders and needs some recipients day somewhere, unless I see a misspelled word I'm wanting to be dazzled to. I think every judge has their personal criteria, or red flags as it were. For me over the past few years, I always look at an envelope, like you mentioned envelope is huge. And absolutely, unless it really suits the mood of the card. I don't like white envelopes. And I think modern card sending just feels to me like it's gravitating more towards smaller card sizes. And while we may have less to say we want our words to be most impactful, but I guess you could define those as my personal quirks. Did you have any

Amy Loewenberg:

as you judged? I did. And as you I hope that they were taken as positively as they were meant. If I felt something was missing, I shared that if the mechanics of the card was not smoothly flowing, I shared that too. But I also made it a point to share. Even though high scores dates this, they don't see who these scores come from. So I would share this completely made me bust out laughing, or I've not seen anything like this in the past because I think it's always nice to acknowledge something new and so on. Right? Yeah, absolutely. But I guess it still remains to be seen what kind of criteria the other judges had. Though that should be clear pretty soon as we learn who the winners are. However, without her first guest, there wouldn't be no Louis awards this year. So Nora Weiser serves as executive director of the greeting card Association, the GCA. This is definitely not her first rodeo by any means.

Sarah Schwartz:

Yeah. Once you meet Nora, that becomes pretty clear pretty quickly. Yeah. She is an experienced and innovative nonprofit executive with over 25 years of nonprofit leadership and board expertise. Nora has served in leadership roles with multiple trade associations, including the museum store Association, the American cheese society, American cider Association, and the specialty food foundation. There she focused on all aspects of governance, growth, product development, event management, public relations, marketing and industry advocacy, working with elected officials and regulators. So obviously for Nora, one little award show is no biggie. So without further ado, let's bring her on already.

Amy Loewenberg:

Hi, Nora. Thank you so much for joining Sarah and I for extra special Louis red carpet podcast this evening.

Nora Weiser:

Hi, Amy. And Hi, Sarah. Thank you so much for having me. I'm also on pins and needles excited to see who our winners are this year. And excited to talk to you guys today.

Amy Loewenberg:

We are totally on pins and needles and we cannot wait for the 32nd annual Louie award digital ceremony to begin right after this podcast airs.

Sarah Schwartz:

Thank you so much for coming, Nora and welcome nor You certainly had your work cut out for you since becoming GCA. President, you were tasked to carry out the 32nd annual Louie awards during a pandemic. And I can imagine you had so many challenges, namely figuring out how to assemble a group of about 30 judges from across the industry and country. And then gather them to judge hundreds of physical card samples. But I'm sure that's just one of them. Of all the challenges. What element Did you find to be the most challenging? And how did you address it?

Unknown:

Sure. Well, hi guys, thank you for having me. It's great to be here out on the red carpet and my backless gown you know, juggling my my flute of champagne. For No, you're quite right, sir, that the challenges were around logistics in many ways. But the logistics you can figure out logistics but we wanted to make sure was that we ensured the integrity of the judging process. What really makes the Louise the Louise and you know special is it's an anonymous judging, and it's based purely on the product. five areas are judged originality, impact, design, excellence, sensibility and value. You know, in a virtual year. This is not a virtual product. That's what makes it special is that it is you know, tactile. And so we wanted to give every card the chance to be reviewed and considered and get the attention that they deserved. We had a great committee that made this all happen committee this year was chaired by Marybeth Siebert of American Greetings. And then we had Susan January of lemon tree for nimble men of designer greetings and Victoria venturi of paper of Tiffany's really did some heavy lifting behind the scenes to figure out how to make it work. We ultimately had kind of a hybrid judging process where judges were able to look at the cards online as kind of a first go round. And then the cards were divided up, split by category and sent to five different physical hubs around the country where judges had a day or two to come in, and feel the cards and hold the cards and you know, get the quality of the paper and the printing and see them in person. And that was really important. And a big challenge to make sure everything got where it had to be. So I think it went really smoothly, the judges all did a great job.

Sarah Schwartz:

And it's a huge, it was a huge endeavor. And I have to say that click on hardware I was it did run like a well oiled machine, like they got us in, we got the cards and we got out, I am so glad that it was not all on screen, because I just think it's so important to see the cards and touch the paper and see what size it is. And you do miss a lot on screen. And especially this year, I think it's very important to see the actual cards.

Amy Loewenberg:

Yeah, totally agree. I was in New York. And even though my, my group was a small hub, it was a it was a real high powered one. So I was honored to be a part of it. And just getting out of my house and being able to touch all these cards and read them and see them and talk to other people about them was just an amazing experience. I was I was so honored to to experience it for the first time.

Unknown:

And it was amazing that all of these volunteer judges, their enthusiasm and how excited they were to see some new cards and to, you know, to be out there and see what's happening. And, you know, not having seen necessarily as many cards as they might have in the past. So it was it was really great, I think all around experience.

Amy Loewenberg:

Well, very clearly, you are serving in a leadership role. And it's not foreign to you just based on what we just experienced. You serve as chair of the board of directors for the specialty food Foundation, you were executive director of the American cheese society and Deputy Director of the museum store Association. So it's easy to say that special projects and making a difference is your specialty. And now you're the executive director for the greeting card Association, the GCA. So I'm just going to say food, cheese museums and greeting cards. Like I don't know what anybody else needs in life, except maybe a glass of wine, right? Are you finding that paper peeps, as we so lovingly refer to them as are just a bit different than your other communities that you've experienced? Or are they similar? Like, Share, share with us your observations? Sure.

Unknown:

So you know, what I love doing is working with nonprofit organizations. It's what I know and do a lot of people that kind of run these types of associations. They love the work and they work with all different kinds of associations in very disparate fields. I mean, the widget Association and financial planning and medical for me I really need to be interested in in the work that the industry that I would be serving and so in my mind, you know museums and food, specialty food, cheese, wine, beer, cider, cards, stationery in my mind, those are all they all fit together because they they require a certain amount of art. They also are usually made by people with Have a lot of passion around what they're doing. There was a joke in the cheese world that if you want to make a small fortune in cheese, you should start with a large fortune. And I'm thinking that might translate to set up a letterpress and start making cards. You know, some people are in that industry because they're passionate, and we actually call them the cheese teams just like, I almost think there are more similarities than differences. You know, they're industries where people who are members of these organizations are competitors, but they don't compete in, you know, kind of a cutthroat way that many industries do. It's more collaborative. They understand that when one person does well, everybody does well, and then the industry does well, you know, even the way they have noted, you know, the greeting card Expo it's, it's less a stand in your booth and hock your cards, then a community coming together to support one another and be excited about what everyone else is doing. You know, everyone wants to see the new card that a competitor is doing not because they're going to copy it not because they're going to, you know, do something different about seeing that it's because they're excited for that person. So, you know, I think that some of those similarities around creative people with a passion for a product. And with a discerning customer base, you know, who's also passionate about it, you have a lot of, you know, there's a magazine for cards, there's a magazine for cheese, it has a cheese centerfold, I mean, you know, people get very, very into it. And so I think it's a lot of fun to work with those types of groups. And you immediately find a lot in common, at least I do with the people who are engaged in those industries.

Amy Loewenberg:

Well, I mean, I can just tell you as I navigate through talking to all the different types of retailers and all the different types of buyers and store concepts that I two experiencing what you are and that people really especially now are just really united in it together and sharing information so that we can all become stronger after a really disruptive time.

Unknown:

Yeah, and their products that bring people together mean if you really go to the core that cards help people feel they're brought together food brings people together in a table and bring people together to experience something you know, great art together so they kind of have their industries that you know bring people like minded people together. Agreed, right? That's beautiful.

Sarah Schwartz:

Yeah. And it's nice to hear cheese's as friendly as stationary. Really, people who are not nice in stationary, I say this all the time, they tend not to stick around very long. Like if you don't really mesh with this kind of community like this just might not be the community for you. And I think that's why I've never left. So Nora, before we let you go, is there anything you can share with us about what we're about to see at the Louise? We won't tell anyone we promise though, I can't guarantee that no one will overhear.

Unknown:

Blush Sure. Well, there there are a few things that I thought were exciting this year, a couple of new categories. There were two categories. One is called trends and events which is very topical and you know includes a lot of cards that came out of the challenges of the past year. And then celebrating diversity which is really recognizing and a desire for the industry to be more inclusive and reflect the diversity of you know of our world. So those I think are exciting categories and then the others are categories that are not about a card but about a compilation or a body of work. One of those is rising star which is for new new cardmakers and the three finalists This year our space pig press, rustbelt, love and melee company to others that I find exciting are illustrator of the year I mean a card you know what matters are the images and the words we've got illustrator of the year and we've got writer of the year and the illustrator of the year category we have Juliana kissick of good Juju Inc. Cory den teeny as Madison Park greetings and then alief within have he Francis paper for writer of the year is Ian Coleman of bald guy Greetings, Lee Stanley of curly girl design for Calypso cards and then Greg voboss, of American Greetings. And so I think it's very exciting to look at the body of work and recognize not just the card, the output of the person behind it is that's kind of the input of the creativity. So those are exciting. And then also, you can see all of the Louis award winning and finalist cards in person at the Atlanta market from July 13th to the 19th. That'll be in building two on the second floor. And then not long after that, from August 8 to 11th. We have a number of GCA members who will be exhibiting it In the GCA village at New York now at the Javits Center, so hopefully, a lot of people will get there to see the Louie cards in person to see some of the makers in person. So it's kind of an exciting summer of activity coming up.

Amy Loewenberg:

It is an exciting summer of activity, we're counting on it, too. I love how you've evolved some of the categories just as like, socially, we're all evolving right now send, and greeting cards are such a social entity that, you know, drive us into so many different emotions. So congratulations to you and the GCA for continually furthering how we see reading cards and how we acknowledge the amazing people behind them.

Sarah Schwartz:

Yeah, absolutely. I mean, like trends and events, I think what's so neat about that category is that, you know, it obviously can reflect whatever's going on any given year. And so, it's, uh, I think, once we have a few years of it, it'll be a really interesting snapshot of American history, you know, through, you know, through greeting cards. And illustrator and writer of the year, I thought that, I mean, that really is almost as important as card of the year I mean, for a maker to be honored with either of those. It's that's like, That's huge. I happen to judge both those categories in the Cleveland hub, I definitely have my ideas about that, I definitely have my favorites. And I mean, they're all amazing, all the finalists are amazing. But I know who I prefer by, though, there was a really, really interesting category to judge with that sort of approach, because I never had. So everyone

Nora Weiser:

is interesting, because I agree, you know, my background is art history. That's what I studied. And when you talked about the cards, they're almost, you know, cards are kind of the daily art form, right? There's art can be so rarefied, and you've got museums, and you know, can't touch anything, you can't get too close to anything but cards, it is art. And it is literature, you know, writ small, and it's kind of a You're right, if we're looking at trends and events in 10 years, and we look back, it will be a little, you know, art history lesson through cards. Wow. Remember, Wasn't there a pandemic that easily forgotten? Well, we'll have a good reminder.

Amy Loewenberg:

Oh, I feel like our designers and makers are going to be reminding for quite a bit, but it's really interesting how the tone has changed, you know, initially was to lift up and now we're like, okay, let's move forward. Let's you know, so definitely has I think helped navigate through hard times, and put us into a different focus of how we move forward and get out of where we were, I am greeting cards on my walls, you know, they are their little bits of art. I'll just say again, I was just really honored to be a part of the process as an old greeting card buyer. It meant a lot to me so I'm really looking forward at what you're doing in the future and what we can see coming down the pike at different markets and and with New York now nor I just I really want to thank you for taking this time with us today. It was just a pleasure to talk to you and we're so excited about what's about to air as soon as as soon as Sarah and I jump off the air

Nora Weiser:

well thank you to both of you guys for judging this year and for having me on and since this is like our red carpet you know moment do we get to channel Joan Rivers and like mock somebody or is that off the table? Oh.

Sarah Schwartz:

Some companies really asked to be mocked in their names like a bald guy. Greetings like this guy. He's just asking people to laugh at him in his cards are very funny. And we'll save that for when we're in person again. How's that? That sounds good. Thank you again, Nora. Thank you guys. Bye. Okay. Well, that's all exciting. I I can't wait for the fun to start shortly. Amy, why don't you tell us about our next guest?

Amy Loewenberg:

Absolutely. Lynn M. Jones learned the art of linoleum block carving and letterpress in 1999. I think Prince wrote a song about that. He did. She started her business just my type letterpress in 2003 Lin cars a clean, detailed linoleum block and she prints them on paper with a 75 to 100 year old press or presses, I believe multiple presses in her stationery shop print studio in Eureka California. Whoa. The newly relocated store sells cards, gifts and art with a focus on local and independent makers and the printing presses are right in the front window lending an open kitchen Feel to the shop.

Sarah Schwartz:

But what makes Lynn the belle of the ball tonight in my eyes is that she entered the Louise for the first time this year. Most small makers are thrilled to get one finalist. Lynn has five crazy. I know insane. I was completely dazzled by her work when I judged it in actually both the Louise and the noted and noted awards, which she also entered. At that point. I wasn't familiar with her range, but I find her work so thoughtfully created. I gave it a lot of high scores.

Amy Loewenberg:

Me too, so let's just bring her on already. Okay, okay.

Sarah Schwartz:

Hi, Lynn. It We're so happy to have you here.

Lynn M. Jones:

Yeah, thanks. I'm really glad to be here.

Sarah Schwartz:

So you've been running your Eureka California paper a for about four and a half years you but you've been letter pressing for over 20 years. Yet 2021 was your first foray into the wholesale market when you participated in noted and entered the Louie's. So I'm curious, what was your reasoning behind this decision? And what have you gotten out of it so far? Well, yeah. So

Lynn M. Jones:

I started the retail shop about five years ago. And what you know, at the beginning, I heard print is dead. And the post office is on his last legs. I heard that for so long. And then I was really surprised to when I was actually in the storefront to see that my cards were selling so well. The cards time after time, were our top selling item. And so I started increasing the number of cards, I was printing for the shop. And then a by 2020 I had over 125 different cards in my line. And I thought well, maybe it's time to start start selling them to other stores as well. But we all know what happened in 2020 it wasn't really time to start doing that. No, it wasn't exactly the year to launch into wholesale. I mean some people did and they did great but I decided to hold off for a little while and focus on the store and make sure that the retail store was still in good shape. So yeah 2021 hit and shows are coming back and stuff so I joined the GCA I entered the Louise I also Andrew noted it noted I showed at noted and yeah got nominated for five Louise and got some attention at noted and yeah, that's been amazing.

Sarah Schwartz:

That's That's great. Yeah. Now when you were talking it made me remember that yes. I must have seen some of your entries and noted at noted as well. Because I know I judged you in both competitions but I thought your work was just stellar. You're which is the set of 13 is that your Halloween? What do you call that with the darker things? I love that I found it. I thought it was really special. So anyone who goes and checks out just my type letterpress please check out her darker things. I thought that was just a phenomenal approach to

Unknown:

darker things. Yeah, so so much stationery is watercolors and light and floral and pink stationery does doesn't have to be just one way. And I hope it catches on. Yeah,

Amy Loewenberg:

yeah, I have no doubt that it is not not going to I mean, you're already in like 20 locations that I can see. You know, your your design is graphic. And it's bold, you know, and there are a lot of people who really appreciate that I'm one of them. I think I think your products are great. I love that you're a retailer, your store looks amazing. That greeting card wall is just but not much that like I could spend hours just drooling along the racks. And I have to admit I learned of you when I was doing my judging duties for the Louise. So again, you know, congratulations on on five Louis nominations. I think it's a really special place to be so you know, Sarah and I just want to make sure you you understand our excitement.

Sarah Schwartz:

Usually like a five time person I know I said this to you. But usually someone who's up for five is either like a very big company or there's someone that we've all that we're all familiar with like an Emily McDowell type of phenomena. And so this was really it's really refreshing to see you and I also love that you let her Pass because you know even just in the time I was in the industry it went from being like the hot thing to sort of fading a bit.

Amy Loewenberg:

Oh, she's taking my question let me jump in there and I do we just we just do stuff like that but she's totally right and she's saying exactly what we all want to know is that you know, you've been creating letterpress since before it was kind of cool. And you know, we're just really curious about your approach to the medium and and then like, what do you think elevates? letterpress design from from good to just a truly great like, like what's in your blood? Like, what do you have that you are pushing across your your letterpress? Sure. Well,

Unknown:

I was lucky enough to score a summer internship with David Lance goines, a designer and printer in Berkeley, California in 1999. I had one more year of school left I was a graphic design major, and art major. And yeah, so he taught me how to use the letterpress after we were done with the big project that he had brought me on specifically for and I really, really love linoleum block carving. So that is my main thing. And the letterpress is just a really consistent way of printing it. So there's three main ways of printing letterpress these days. You've got your photopolymer, which is plastic plates. They're created from a digital file. And then you've got antique or vintage, led or wood type. And then you've got hand carved blocks, either wood or linoleum. So I print from linoleum blocks. An example of someone who does the photopolymer plates really well is quick brown, Fox letterpress. Yeah. Her registration, which is lining up the colors is just amazing. She's so precise. And then someone who does the metal and vintage type really well is star shaped press. She's in Chicago and she does mostly direct to consumer. I don't know she does much wholesale but she is incredible with the images that she constructs with these little tiny pieces of metal type. It's fantastic.

Amy Loewenberg:

I think the whole process is pretty amazing. Sorry, sir. I think it's pretty amazing.

Sarah Schwartz:

It is. It is I mean like I remember hearing like it takes 20 minutes to letter learning how to letterpress takes 20 minutes to learn and a lifetime to perfect. I don't know really how to do it. So you're way ahead of me.

Amy Loewenberg:

Well, I'm sorry, I interrupted you each other today. Just wait till the next interview Sarah. Got it out for me. I'm just remembering like, you know, in high school when I did my linoleum you know, print and I was carving out and and how much fun I had with that. So you listen to any of our interviews, you'll hear how jealous of everybody who creates. So let's um, let's let's talk a little bit about how you navigated through what 2020, because you did mention it before. And you know, obviously, it was a pretty disruptive year. But you said that you really wanted to make sure that your store was was kind of running so your attention was there. So what what are some of the hiccups that you experienced? What were some of the positives that you experienced with trying to manage your store and then your printing?

Unknown:

Sure. So when I started the retail store, in 2016, we were on the side of a building. So we were like just off the beaten path. We had 1000 square foot retail shop. And in 2020, the front storefront of the same building came became available. And it was a real risky situation. I had no idea. Of course, none of us knew what things were going to be like in two months for six months versus a year. But I had good rapport with the landlord, and we were able to work out a deal. And I signed a three year lease on the bigger storefront that has much better foot traffic. And just that visibility alone basically saved the store. You know, we were only allowed to have four people in here at a time during the holidays. And we still had a better Christmas than we ever had any other store. So yeah, it was really moving, that that saved us. I also, you know, kept up at least monthly communication with my email list to let them know that we were still selling online, even if they couldn't come into the store. Our area, I mean, Eureka, California, which is considered behind the redwood curtain, we're very geographically isolated. And a lot of people here, understand that we really have to look out for each other. And they understand the importance of buying locally. So yeah, a lot of support from the people, my loyal customers that I'd built up over the last four years, I guess, of, of having the store.

Amy Loewenberg:

Wow, I mean, I'm taking that real risky jump, you know, a lot of people didn't make that a lot of people are too scared. So congratulations, sometimes you just have to weigh out the pros and the cons, and then just take, you know, a leap of faith and see what happens and hope your community supports you. And it sounds like they did.

Unknown:

Yep. Yep. I even joined the Chamber of Commerce and then Business of the Year.

Amy Loewenberg:

That's awesome. Congratulations.

Sarah Schwartz:

Thanks. Yeah. Well, your stories, you I mean, that from your website, I mean, the picture your story. It looks beautiful. And how big is it?

Unknown:

It's about 1500 square feet. And I have my printing presses right in the window. So that draws people in. We get a lot of tourists in the summer. Yeah. So they just see this big, gorgeous building. I mean, we're in one of the biggest buildings in Eureka, not just old town, but all of Eureka. And so it draws attention. And then such a weird thing going on, quote, unquote, weird thing going on in the window, that really gets people's attention. And and then there's a big we, we feel like there's a big educational part, to the business as well. People come in that what the heck is that thing? Yeah. And we take the time, and we explain to them, what's going on how the press works. You know, sometimes it's just little kids who are super interested in our machinery. And, you know, I wasn't exposed to that kind of thing as a kid. But maybe I would have figured out my calling even sooner if I had been

Amy Loewenberg:

Yeah, well, we are just super excited that you did find your calling. And it truly is proving to be your calling with again, we'll say it everybody listening, five Louis nominations. So we just want to thank you for joining us on our little red carpet saunter into the Louise, and to say congratulations to you. And you really are. Sarah might say this a little bit more eloquently than I but you really are a vision of what can happen when you align with certain communities and associations. You know, the communities here are tight and solid and support and lift each other up. And talent is appreciated. So congratulations, again, for just taking that leap of faith and just moving in that direction. By the way, there's like a lot of stuff on your website I want. So just be on the lookout for an order. Thanks.

Sarah Schwartz:

Yes. And I just agree with everything. Amy just said what she just said, with just you know, good luck. Good luck. Yeah.

Lynn M. Jones:

Thank you so much. It's a really exciting time.

Amy Loewenberg:

Well, with that we say thank you. And we will talk to you again soon and see you online. And good luck. Thanks.

Sarah Schwartz:

Well, that was fun. Thank you again for joining us for chat and cocktails.

Amy Loewenberg:

But the fun is not over yet. There's still time to be a part of the Louis awards, just by going to greeting card.org and click on the Louis awards along the top bar to snag your seat.

Sarah Schwartz:

And after the show, be sure to join Amy and I are at the virtual Louis party. Amy and I are hosting our own breakout room and no offense to the other hosts. But let's just say ours is going to be the place to be of course.

Amy Loewenberg:

However, if you are listening to this post event, you can then go to the GCA website and look at all the winners from tonight's festivities. And of course, you can also see some of the UI contributors and maybe even some of the winners at the GCA village live and in person not on a screen at the New York now market this August 8 through 11th. So

Sarah Schwartz:

let's get our Louis on. Absolutely. And if you have not joined the greeting card Association, definitely consider it if you can't already tell it is such a welcoming community with great events throughout the year. That leave you feeling connected and inspired. Their next big event is their workshop and retreat happening September 9 and 10th. Virtually, the theme is see what unfolds and I think there will be quite a lot to unfold. A little birdie told me that a certain store tour diva whom you all know will be sharing her brand building savvy there. That alone is worth the price of admission. Sarah, thank

Amy Loewenberg:

you.

Sarah Schwartz:

I know you're gonna be awesome. Meanwhile, please don't forget to post Instagram pics of your paper plane using the hashtags, the paper plane podcast and hashtag paper playing cocktail hour. Amy, where can our listeners find you in the meantime? Well,

Amy Loewenberg:

you can connect with me on [email protected] ny and o w, LinkedIn or email me at work. I always want to highlight our amazing community on my spotlight podcasts and feature on my Instagram store tours. And I'm available to help connect you to new and needed resources and answer any of your New York mail market or digital market questions. And Sarah Why don't you share how we can connect with you?

Sarah Schwartz:

Probably the best place to find me is at the paper nerd comm you can see more fabulous stationery coverage check out my podcast the paper fold and access stationary trends, the industry's award winning design driven trade quarterly as well. It's always a pleasure to learn more about makers and spotlight their work, whether it's in a publication, a blog or podcast forum. If you want to connect, I'd love to hear from you.

Amy Loewenberg:

Please don't hesitate to reach out to either of us with your comments questions, feedback suggestions for guests or just to say hi and introduce yourself. Cheers.