NY NOW Podcast

Tomorrows Retail World

June 23, 2021 NY NOW Season 1 Episode 44
NY NOW Podcast
Tomorrows Retail World
Show Notes Transcript

Buyer Spotlight? Maybe more an interview turned conversation on everything NY NOW with accomplished owner and buyer Edward Nader of Edward Nader Design and Nader’s Gallery in Shreveport, LA and Amy Loewenberg of NY NOW.  Whether you are a new buyer or an experienced one, join us for a “Nothing’s off the table” conversation covering topics on everything from the market and our tools to all recent NY NOW announcements, upcoming Summer 21 Market and NYC! 

RESOURCES   
| Guest
Website:   
https://www.nadersgallery.com/

| NY NOW :
https://nynow.com

| NY NOW Podcast Page:
https://nynow.com/podcast   

| NY NOW Digital Market:
https://nynowdigitalmarket.com   


Dondrill Glover:

Welcome to the new york now podcast, a modern wholesale market for retailers and specialty buyers seeking diversity and discovery, gathering twice a year in America's design capital New York City. It's where buyers and designers on earth have refreshed and dedicated collection of eclectic lifestyle products. Welcome to the new york

Amy Loewenberg:

now buyer spotlight podcast. I'm Amy lowenberg relations and partnership development manager at New York now, and I'll be bringing you important information, conversations and perspectives from both sides of the aisle. I treasure the relationships I've established and I relish in the new ones I make every day, sharing information introducing our amazing community of retailers, buyers, vendors, artists and makers through my spotlight podcast at New York now, and my store tours on Instagram. Today we're talking with designer Edward Nader, longtime buyer in New York now and someone who I easily refer to as an expert in his field, and people his fields are best. Edward is known for creating timeless and modern yet classic interiors with an eye for exquisite detail. His design style encompasses clean, uncluttered, sophisticated elegance. With nearly 40 years in the design business. He spent several years in journalism focusing on design trends and color forecasting for both international and regional publications. He's also built an extremely diverse design portfolio, which includes luxury hotels, real estate development, Executive Office suites, retail boutiques, and many residential projects. He is the driving force behind Edward neater design, comprising furniture, artwork and accessories. In collaboration with some of the home furnishings industry's most respected international brands, such as global views Left Bank art, William D. Scott, saunder, living, elle, calm and amb home among many others. His furniture and accessories are currently available at fine retailers and hospitality projects worldwide. Edward is also the co founder of naters Gallery in Shreveport, Louisiana, with his sister Margaret love, a family business that has been offering the finest in art, framing accessories and gifts since 1969. Hey, Edward, thank you so much for joining me today. Hey, Amy, how are you? I'm doing good. So we first met at the New York now summer market in 2018. And since then, we've had the opportunity to walk many markets and have many conversations on the topic of markets. We are all moving forward after a very disruptive 2020 people have had to make some hard choices. They've navigated through challenges, and they've made change. And as our tradeshow calendars are so wonderfully filling up again, I thought that it would be great to chat with about some of the subjects and questions that surround them with your experience and deep insight of trade shows. And there are many characteristics and attributes that we could have a great conversation about New York now. You know, you're someone who I know can provide new ways to look at markets and how we work with them. And I'm constantly trying to connect with new buyers, and I thought you would be a great voice for them to hear. And you're a straight shooter. And I've always appreciated that. So let's dive in. Okay, are you ready?

Edward Nader:

I'm ready.

Amy Loewenberg:

All right, here we go. Big question for you. There are so many reasons why trade shows are important. But why don't we start with why they are important to you?

Edward Nader:

Well, I think the trade shows are so important because we it gives us an opportunity to build relationships. And I think the bigger part is, yes, we're all there trying to get new products and we're all trying to get the greatest and best and latest and all of that but the most important thing is the relationships and we have to have the conversations with people and then learn about the products and have a have those relationships with with the vendors and the exhibitors and to be able to touch and feel and really be able to explore all those products at once. And your mind is in a mindset when you're at a trade show. You're in the middle of trying to find the new products and so you're, you're you're so engrossed in it, and you're able to be so drilled into that at that time. It's it's so much different than shopping products online or things like that. 100% agree,

Amy Loewenberg:

the relationships and the stories behind them and the connections that we have with them, and their makers make everything about what we're presenting for our consumer.

Unknown:

Plus, if you have the opportunity to take some time and get to know the people behind the product and the product has For a rich, vibrant approach, and you are able to show your products to, you know, you have a story, a story goes with it, it's so nice to have a story to go with the product. So that's, that's one of the things I love the most, you know, my team at work always gives me grief. And they always laugh and tell me, you know, you always have a story with the product, but you know that that's what makes the difference, you know, products or products?

Amy Loewenberg:

Yeah, I think it makes the best difference of all because it's not just a story with the product, it's the story with the people behind the product. And then it's a story about what the product means to the person buying it. I mean, it's, it is exactly what our industry is, is built on is those relationships, you know, and your relationship with the ark now is a really deep one, you've been attending it since it was the New York International affair, you sit on our advisory board, you participate in focus group calls with your peers and upper management. And you have not missed one market until a pandemic made us all miss one. So what makes New York now so important to you?

Unknown:

Well, you know, I mean, it's kind of funny, because years and years ago, when I first went to the first one I was I was a young kid actually opening a store. And I went to New York now and well with the New York International gift fair at the time. And when I walked in there, I realized that there is such an amazing cross sampling of products that are fresh and new. And, you know, everything was unique. And I was just overwhelmed with it. And then I began to buy in every market, I would bring back new products market, it New York now. And they always made my store a little bit different. They differentiated me from all of the other galleries or gift stores and our community are anywhere really for that matter. It's always the best, that the hottest, the newest, the freshest. And that's one of the reasons I love it so much is because I can always go there. And I can always get a handful of products that will make my store the different place to go. And I'm always the leader, it always made us the leaders in good design. And so by the time that the rest of the world caught up and bought the same products I was on to another one was back in another New York now there's another new vendor, and I'm able to get new products. And it would always just keep this freshness. And it was always just kind of a non stop feeding of new products into our store to keep fresh life.

Amy Loewenberg:

Alright, I love to hear that. And so now I'm going to ask you a really important question. What are you expecting this August when you come to New York now,

Unknown:

to be honest, I'm not expecting it to be the biggest of all the shows, but I am expecting it to still have that rich, rich core of good products. You know, it doesn't always have to be the biggest, but it can always be the best. And the quality of the products are going to still be there. It's going to be new introductions, it's going to be stuff that's not been seen or shown anywhere else. So it's going to still keep our store fresh and lively. And put this whole new life blood back in it again. So don't expect it to be the biggest show. And quite honestly, it doesn't necessarily need to be the biggest, it just needs to be the best.

Amy Loewenberg:

I agree with you 100%. You know, I mean, the landscape of trade shows has changed immensely over the last year. And you know, you're someone who's actually been to a few markets through 2020, when it was a really challenging time. What was that like?

Unknown:

Well, you know, for a while now, the markets kind of had gotten a little, I'm just kind of repetitive, and I think it had lost, a lot of them lost their luster long before the pandemic. So they were just they needed new life and they needed so it really had it was kind of good in a way we're using this as kind of a reset. So one of these other markets that started off at the beginning of this year, um, they didn't, nobody really knew kind of what to expect. But the last one I just attended a few weeks back, there was such a level of enthusiasm and energy and a lot of people are people are hungry and yearning to get back to the, to the personal relationships and go you know, it's it's funny that we we don't want to say that we really took it for granted. But I think a lot of us in the industry kind of took it for granted because we just kind of expected that the markets would be there and after a period of not seeing one another and not getting these new fresh products and all this we're so hungry for it. We got back. There's there's a lot of energy in the industry. All categories, furniture, gifts, lighting, all of that. There's so much energy being placed back into these markets and people are enthusiastic. I've seen more hope in the last six months than I have been yours. And I just think everybody's ready to get back and make it happen now.

Amy Loewenberg:

Yeah, I totally agree with you. You know, I mean, all of us, no matter what show you went to we all experience To pandemic we all experience like this massive disruption to the way we do business. The size of the market I think you hit the nail on the head before is, it's not about how big it is. It's about how good it is. Right? Right. Correct. Taking advantage of the opportunity in this case, you know, we call them the silver linings like the opportunity of time, that was just given to us for this last year, to rebuild in a new way, which I want to talk to you about a little bit later. But you know, it, it's not indigenous to one market, like the size is not indigenous to one market, it is all all markets. And we all have to put our best foot forward so that we can continue to strengthen an industry that we love so much. It's not just the trade shows the brands are experiencing their, you know, chain of supply issues the retailers are experiencing, you know, they were closed for the majority of the year, there are all these elements that we are all coming out of. But we all have a part to play in helping to strengthen our industry. So

Unknown:

I think a big part of that, too, is our expectations. I don't think we need to have unrealistic expectations where everybody has dialed it way down. And now we're amping it back up. But I think we're ramping it back up very methodically, and it won't be all willy nilly. We're all very focused on what we want. And we're touring a lot, a lot of exhibitors are trimming down their, their collections to the most key collections. And the thing is, we don't need to be the biggest, we don't need to have the most, we just need to be the best and have the best pieces. And I think it's given everybody an opportunity to reset and reformulate. And I think that is the good part that came out of all of this.

Amy Loewenberg:

I agree. And we have to look at the good that came out of this. You know, we we've talked about how this past year is has fostered so much change and positive change, you know, but one of the exciting aspects is that many got their digital on, you know what I mean? Our retailers? did, we did, our tradeshow contemporaries did. And we're all a bit different. And we all provide a little bit of a different platform, but we all are concentrating on providing business growth and development and vendor buyer connections and, and ultimately just just bringing more value to our community by serving their needs. So just like everything new, it takes time to get used to this. And although we seem to be doing that nicely, what are your thoughts on digital marketplaces and how they work?

Unknown:

Well, you know, I'm an old guy, so I'm kind of resistant to change. Human nature, we're all we're all resistant to change. And I'm, you know, I'm so used to old school markets to walk to have a conversation, to touch to feel that this thing, and it is the way it's going. And there is the digital market is going to continue to build, of course, I was resistant beginning like everybody are a little bit more resistant to people

Amy Loewenberg:

You are getting it Edward, I see your activity in the market,

Unknown:

more market? Well, you know, the first one, you know, I've kind of fumbled around. And then the second one I really got a little bit more involved in. But what I really think is it's going to be is it's going to be one facet is going to support the other I think the domain, the way I'm using the digital market, now that I'm getting a little bit better handle on it. The way I'm using is I'm going in and I'm doing my little research ahead of time, I'll pour myself a glass of wine, I'll be sitting in a room I can go through, I'm actually shopping the market before I even get there. So I have an idea of what to expect and what I'm looking for, I can find new things, and I can go this is fantastic. Let me be sure to put this on my walking list. And you know, one of the things I do do that's kind of digitally related is I use the app, all the markets I go to I really, really exercise the app, I think that that is an amazing tool. And I think a lot of times people don't take advantage of that. But it gives you an opportunity to kind of make yourself a little checklist or walking list, get ready to go and do you know, kind of prepare, it gives you an opportunity to kind of go over what you're gonna do. And then once you get to market, you feel like you're already empowered, like you've already had a day at market before you even walk in the door. So you have a jump ahead.

Amy Loewenberg:

That is such an incredible scent sentence that you just said, because you've to think about all the new buyers who are coming to market who are just maybe a little wayward, you know, they're excited to come to market for maybe a first second time, but not really sure how to use it like like someone like you do. And And And now to understand that you can actually use an app, it's integrated with our software on the digital marketplace. You can you can do more than just write yourself a list of these are the people I want to go see you can actually communicate with them prior to the market.

Unknown:

I agree. And that's one of the things I really like, Is it something that I'm interested in? Then I can just hit a button, ask your question, get some information, go and get it down on started. If it's something I'm very interested in, we'll go ahead and start our account. Open that up, get it ready to go. Then we're rolling when we get to market. Yeah,

Amy Loewenberg:

yeah, there. There is one aspect of of our of our platform that I actually really like. And that is, the more somebody uses it, the more the software gets to know you, and can start to present items for you in the very beginning, you're going to be like, why do I want to look at a keychain? But right? Like, the more you dial in, the more sophisticated the AI will be for you. And I just I just keep thinking of my very first market and my very first market was the New York International gift fair. And just how, you know, I mean, I was a baby, buddy. And I just remember being so wide eyed and just like, thank God, I had somebody leading me because if I were there on my own, I don't know, I don't know, if I would have seen everything that I really needed to see.

Unknown:

Well, you know, that's, that's one of the things it's like. So I consider myself a seasoned buyer. I've been in business nearly 40 years, do all the major markets, including Paris, and that's so you know, every time I go to a major market, it's a big, it's a bigger market and an unplanned and I walk in the very first few minutes, I'm like, oh, like it's brand new. It's like it started all over again. I'm like, Oh, god, I'm overwhelmed. Where do I start, but it gives me a second, you know, like for, like, for instance, in New York, now, I have my little way I do and I walk in, I kind of walk all the aisles on accent on design, it gives me a pulse of what's happening there. It gives me a forward trending gives me an idea of what's happening. And then after a few minutes, I have my grounding. And then I'm good to go. And then I'll walk it and I'll walk every square into that market and never, never miss a corner. You know, I just think it's one of those things, too. A lot of buyers, they will go to these markets. And they'll go well, this is more of our look in this area. But this isn't. And sometimes, you know, people get moved around. And they're not always in the area where they're supposed to be best for you. But so always make every square inch of every market and I'll always find a diamond in the rough back in this corner where I wouldn't have normally you know, I'll be walking with friends and they'll go, oh, that didn't look like anything we have. I'm not going down there and like Bongo, and they're like, well, there's nothing down there for me. Then a couple of weeks later, they'll see something on Instagram. They'll go, Wait, that's the coolest thing. Where'd you get it was like it New York now was right there. It's like, Oh, my Oh, you wouldn't walk with me. So it's really so many places that you'll find so many things like that, as you walk through the show. So that's, that's really important to do, too. It's you know, everybody has their own way of doing their market. And, you know, I'm a creature of habit, like I said, and it works for me. And it's been successful. So I'm, you know, I just have my little way of doing it. Yeah, I wish somebody had taken me under their wing when I was young, and taught me how to do it. Because, you know, it was a learning curve, it took a minute.

Amy Loewenberg:

Well, I mean, I I was definitely taken under a wing. And very, very quickly, I was like, I got to fly, because I just wanted to look at every little nook and cranny of that market. And I just realized that, you know, we have different kinds of buyers. And I'm I was a buyer that had to see everything because I wanted to make the best and wisest decisions, right? And just like you said, it's thinking that diamond that like nobody saw because they were in like the last booth in the far corner. And you know what, that was a great spot for them because I saw them, you know? Exactly. covering every square and you got to you got to and you know what, we're probably going to shake you up a little bit on this next market, because the Javits has changed a bit. And it's our first market outside of a pandemic. And our our landscape has changed a bit. So some of the areas that you might be familiar with, might be updated a bit, and I'm going to use that as a lead in to my next little, you know, bit of information for you. You know, you actually, it's not really information, you actually reached out to me about a couple of big announcements that we've made recently. It's a really nice moment for us as we rebuild post pandemic. We took great advantage of the time that was given to us in 2020. And we took our first steps in our relaunch of our event with a refreshed visual identity, developed in collaboration with a globally renowned design studio pentagram, who, by the way, is the world's world's largest independent design consultancy, and our award winning creative director, the enchanting Brad Ford, interior designer, founder of field and supply and for those who don't know what field and supply is, you should it's a modern makers craft fair in upstate New York. And he has fair which is a gorgeous showroom in the New York Design Center. So clearly to get back to what you said before. Industry relationships and partnerships are going to Continue to pave the way to what comes next. So what are your thoughts on those big announcements that we just made?

Unknown:

Well, I think it's fantastic. I mean, I think breadboard is a brilliant designer. And I think that I think it's a very wise move for New York now to bring a creative director into play to kind of make it all very cohesive, and a lot of continuity through the whole rebranding and the new logos and the different categories, and so that they're all cohesive, and they all one plays off of the other so beautifully, I think a lot of times and a lot of markets and a lot of situations period. So many great teams are working together. But you know, sometimes the right hand doesn't know what the left hand is doing. And they don't really communicate as well. But I think if you get yourself a creative director that has the bigger picture and works with all of these other teams, then you have a much more cohesive approach and a plan. And it just seems to make sense. And it just, it seems to all be very fluid, the way it goes together like that.

Amy Loewenberg:

Yeah, and this is the perfect timing to do it. Right.

Unknown:

Correct. And I think it's also fresh to think, you know, we're all looking at everything. The thing is post pandemic, everybody's looking at things differently. They're they're reassessing things. And I think this is a perfect opportunity for everybody to pull back, look at what they're doing and do the best reformulation that they can at this time. And I think that it gives us an opportunity. And I think a fresh brand and a fresh look. And, you know, I think the colors are good, I think they're a little bit they they're bringing your attention, they just kind of you do a double take. They're not loud enough to bring your attention over there. But it just gets your attention to kind of wake it up a little bit your way, what's going on over here. Something's fresh, something new, let me pay attention. And so it's bringing my attention back to it. And I think that'll be great.

Amy Loewenberg:

That that is that is great. It's it's actually a really great to hear. You know, we've now just done a complete update of our website and all of our social media outlets. Personally, I can't wait for my business cards to come because I think they're gonna be really great looking. And, you know, and I think it kind of shows a little bit of a new personality that that's that's coming out, you know, exactly.

Unknown:

I think that's the whole thing is we need new and fresh. And the the whole idea of New York now is new, fresh, better, new, fresh, new, the best, the new, the greatest. And I think that that's so great that you that it doesn't just stay stale and stagnant that it gets a refresh, because I think that's important.

Amy Loewenberg:

Yeah, I mean, I think it was time, I think I think it was time. And I think that it was, let me rephrase that. I think it was perfect timing. I think it was perfect timing, you know, in our relationship with Brad, is he's going to help us identify and showcase new leading themes in the gift and home industry, which is really important for us. He's gonna be working on product displays, and celebrating our brands and and probably help us to create, I guess, more of a safe environment for the New York now markets. You know, I mean, can we take a moment here, like, let's just look at the magnitude of all that we've done. We've introduced the digital market or working with pentagram in the amazing Brad Ford, our community is able to access our brands on a 365 platform, we now have a great updated brand that we just relaunched. And honestly, it'll be more appreciated in August when we're at the Javits in their newly renovated space. So, you know, the way I see it is New York now has a really strong physical and digital foundation now to renew our market, and to deliver a more purposeful and thoughtful experience to our community. Did you see what our tagline is?

Unknown:

Yes. And I love that. Is it? Okay, today's wholesale market for tomorrow's retail world?

Amy Loewenberg:

I love it. Yep. It's New York. Now you got it. I'm so glad.

Unknown:

I love that. I just read that. And I think that that's, I mean, that's a good way to put it. It's, it is for tomorrow's real world. Because everything is changing. It's changing so rapidly. It's almost impossible to keep up with. But it seems like y'all are responding in such a rapid way that you're that you're keeping up with it, and that you are paving the way for tomorrow's retail.

Amy Loewenberg:

I love hearing you say it. I know that I was a little bit on my soapbox there. But I love. I love that you're saying that. So let's let's shift gears a little bit. What would be your best advice for maybe a new buyer or one that may not have the New York City experience?

Unknown:

Well, I'll tell a lot of my friends that are starting stores, you know, they'll say we're getting ready to start a store, what should you do and I give them the name of a couple of markets to go and what New York Mills always want to always tell them that if you go to this market, you are able to see what is coming ahead and you may be too advanced for what you're trying to do. But it's what's coming. So give yourself the option. opportunity to at least be aware of what's what is on point or on trend. And that you will be able to get a handful of products that will differentiate your store from every other store. And you will be able to have those few little diamonds in your store that make the place where people want to go to if they want to go to your store, because it is the most unique. And I tell it's New York City, it's the epicenter of good design, there is no way you won't just walk away with when you hit the ground in New York, you you, you pick up this energy, there's this energy and crazy amount of creative stimulation. Like, every time I go, I've been to New York since January of last year, February with the last time I was in New York now. And I'm usually there, you know, four or five times a year, I always have to go there. It's where I go to get the creative stimulation to really drive our store as leader in good design. And, you know, just simple simple things like walking down the street and paying attention to the windows and all that will just feed so much of it, then you walk right into the Javits Center. And it's all right there for you to be able to grab and start relationship with these people. So I mean, a new buyer should do a little bit their homework, like I said, Go online, do the digital marketplace and really look at it and kind of get an idea what's going on. And again, my advice is to walk every square inch of the building, because there's going to be something somewhere that's more of this, but they have four or five items that it's going to complete it and round out your product lines, you know, and so take your time and just drill through every square inch of that building. Yeah, you know, that's, that's how you have to do

Amy Loewenberg:

it. Yeah, I just think New York is such an important region for anybody to have a connection with, and to take advantage of the fact that that we have an incredible market and an incredible space to be able to take advantage of, you know, you need to be represented in New York, if we're talking to a brand. And you need to know absolutely what is hot in New York so that you can you know, elevate your product

Unknown:

assortment. No question, no question. And it's a very, very simple market to work. Writing, it's, it's straight, it's straight rows. So you can start and you can, everything's clearly labeled, you start at one end, you go back and forth. And you know, if you're not doing children's clothes, you can skip that section. If you're not doing stationary, you can maybe skip that section, but I still walk them if I have the time. I'll walk through them. There's always something abundant every one of those Secchi

Amy Loewenberg:

because I mean, we know that our incredible stationery brands have other products more than paper that might resonate with somebody, or that you know, I'll store might have some really cool item that is a, you know, your next POS item. It really does behoove you to look at every every nook and cranny. But you know what, let's go in a little bit deeper to New York, because there's a little bit of a buzz out there right now about New York safety. I've had a few conversations about it already. And I live here. I've got some pretty strong opinions, which I don't mind sharing. But how are you thinking about New York City? And then what can you share about travel and the city seeing that you are an experienced New York City visitor?

Unknown:

Well, I've just I've never had an issue with safety or felt unsafe in New York and my design assistant and I just got back she went to go see your grand son in New York last week. She said New York Swan open, it's just regular normal, just as good as it's always been. It's been, you know, fine, say great thing about it. You know, people say, oh, New York State, it's not dangerous. Any city is dangerous. If you don't use good judgment. You need to be cognitive, you need to use good judgment and not, you know, be on a desolate street at four o'clock in the morning by yourself. That's not a plus. I mean, most of the city that you're going to stay in that most of the hotels are in there in the center of the city, there's plenty of buzz, there's plenty of people, there's plenty of police presence. There's never an issue with safety, that sort of thing. Just be mindful. Keep your belongings on you. I mean, the same thing you do in your own city, any city can have crime, but I don't think there's I've never and I've been going to New York on a regular basis for as long as I can remember. I've never once felt unsafe there ever and yeah, you know, it's it's just be mindful. Just be sensible.

Amy Loewenberg:

Yeah, that that that's really the message that I would want to convey to you know, New York is a major metropolis, right. You know, we're a major city and in any major city you visit, you need to stay alert and use your common sense, you know, Nobody wants to fling around their pocketbook over their head pocket book that that word just dated. Love. I might edit that out you might you don't want to swing your purse around your head and you're not like oh like pocket book. Well, that's because we're close in age my friends

Unknown:

are the other thing people call it is a handbag. bag or handbag. Oh, you left her handbag.

Amy Loewenberg:

Great, but we don't want to leave our handbag like behind us. We don't put our bags on the floor like these are just common, common sense issues. And, you know, I guess what I would want to convey is, you know, we're run New York City and we're one of the I think we're like the most visited city in the nation. So you know, the media that goes out about is a little amplified, but it is. It is a safe place to come. And by the way, the Javits Center, like, I feel safe walking to the Javits Center, you know, I'm a New Yorker, there are places that I wouldn't want to walk around after a certain hour. Javits Center is not one of them. You know,

Unknown:

I think you're more than say, I think anywhere in the city, pretty much, you're safe. Like I said, after all these years, I've been going in and out and just never, I never think twice of it. I don't ever, I would never worry about the safety there.

Amy Loewenberg:

Well, it's good to hear you say, because I'm planning on seeing you in August.

Unknown:

I can't wait. I'm ready to get back and we're ready to see the new brand. I'm ready to see the new layout, I can't wait to see what kind of new products are going to be there. I think everybody is just ready to go. I think we're all ready to go. Well,

Amy Loewenberg:

we are putting our best foot forward for you. And for everybody else who joins us we have a great list of buyers who have already registered, we've got a great list of brands that is continuing to grow and evolve. So many new so many emerging. We've got old friends who are coming back, honestly, I cannot wait to walk the aisles again and get back with my people. And you are one of them. So will you walk with me? Oh, I

Unknown:

love it. I'm so excited about seeing everybody, you know, I was just talking to him here at my house at the beach on the Gulf Coast of Florida, actually have a couple of days vacation. And so I'm here with a friend. And we were talking and I told him that I was going to be doing this zoom call with you. And we started talking and I looked around my place. And I started looking at all of the things that I had here from 30 years ago, 20 years ago, from friends that we have started relationships with. And I'll look at all of the I can name dozens of people that have developed not only just a great business relationship, but a very deep friendship with and friends, other buyers that I've stayed in touch with that we have dinner markets and that sort of thing. It's just it's one of those things that I've got a very strong relationship to New York now because of the relationships that I've built through it. And all of these people that I stay in touch with all of these years and people that have the first time they ever showed and I'd bother products, and then they become a household name. I mean, I can go on and on and on and name them I probably shouldn't. But I should and could enlist that I have these great relationships. And they all were built right there in the Javits Center.

Amy Loewenberg:

Well, it is, it is a humbling thing to hear. And I love it. I relate to it. And I am so glad that I can call you my friend. And I look forward to seeing you in August.

Unknown:

I cannot wait. I'm ready to get it going again.

Amy Loewenberg:

Alright, my friend, thank you so much for joining me today and having this real upfront conversation about New York now. I appreciate it. I appreciate your candor. I know that our listeners do. So with that. I say goodbye. And thank you and I will talk to you soon. Bye. Thank you, Amy. Bye. Bye. Thank you so much for joining us today and what was nothing's off the table conversation with both Edward Mater and myself. Please be sure to connect with him at Edward Nadir design on Instagram. And don't forget New York now is now an online 365 sourcing and connection platform. Make sure to sign up and sign in and definitely connect with me when you do. Thank you again so much and I will talk with you soon.

Dondrill Glover:

Thank you for listening to the New York now podcast. Make sure to tune in weekly for engaging and insightful conversations touching on the most relevant topics facing our community today. Is it through your mouth comm to learn more about our market, and how you can join in on the conversation