NY NOW Podcast

The Paper Plane Cocktail Hour: A Sticky Subject

March 11, 2021 NY NOW Season 1 Episode 31
NY NOW Podcast
The Paper Plane Cocktail Hour: A Sticky Subject
Show Notes Transcript

Not just for kids anymore, stickers have become palm-sized purveyors of design, adding pops of humor as they express personality. These artful adhesives can be sweet, funny, provocative, or political, and their affordability and accessibility make them downright addictive. Our two guests have made this phenomenal add-on work for them. Brittany O’Brien’s female-friendly range has appeared in Glamour and been shouted out by Simone Biles, Sophia Busch and Carole Radziwill, while Jennifer Luna is a recognized 40 under 40 award winner, keeps her sticker assortments full and her customers coming back for more. Listen in, and you too will get stuck on this hot trend!

RESOURCES
| Websites:
Brittany Paige:  https://brittanypaige.com/     
Paper Luxe:  https://paper-luxe.com/     

Amy Loewenberg https://www.instagram.com/amy.atnynow     

Sarah Schwartz https://www.instagram.com/ms_sarah_schwartz     

| NY NOW Podcast Page: https://nynow.com/podcast     

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Amy Loewenberg:

Hi, everyone, and welcome to the paper plane cocktail hour. I'm one of your hosts Amy lowenberg relations and partnership development manager at New York now, as a past buyer, I surrounded myself with everything paper and Home Goods oriented and I continue to do so to this day. I treasure the relationships I've established and I relish the new ones I make every day, sharing information and introducing our amazing community of retailers, buyers, artists and makers through my spotlight podcast at New York now, and my store tours on Instagram.

Sarah Schwartz:

And I'm your host Sarah, you may know me as the founding editor and editor in chief of stationary trends magazine, my site, the paper nerd or possibly my other podcast, the paper fold. I've been covering the stationery and gift industry since 1998. But never did I imagined that I'd one day be covering the market here in the virtual space. So throughout 2021 we'll be raising our glasses alongside our pencils. As we share stories, compare notes and celebrate three of our all time favorite topics, stationery connection and cocktails. Cheers. Cheers. So for marches episode, Amy and I are celebrating Women's History Month with you. We've sought out two incredibly talented women business owners to talk with today. But before we introduce them to you, we'd also like to acknowledge another very important date. Amy, why don't you spell?

Amy Loewenberg:

Yeah, we not only want to celebrate Women's History Month, but we also want to acknowledge that this month marks the year anniversary of when we began our shutdown due to the spread of covid 19. And our entry into a worldwide pandemic. We've been through so much this past year, and Sarah and I have talked with so many amazing and brave people who have shared their stories with us. And we just wanted to take a moment to recognize all of you. Our connections and support of each other are just it's even more important than ever now.

Sarah Schwartz:

Absolutely. I cannot believe it has been a year it seems like far more personally speaking as someone who lived and worked downtown on 911. Afterwards, I definitely mentally divided my life into before and after. I think many of us will do the same thing with COVID-19. But it's not necessarily a bad thing as a reset also represents a fresh start with a fresh perspective, which we can all very much use right about now.

Amy Loewenberg:

Absolutely.

Sarah Schwartz:

So our episode today revolves around a much lighter topic thankfully, stickers. Which I think I have have not just buoyed our spirits throughout pandemic, they've made many lawmakers bottom line. But before we introduce our two guests, let me ask you a What is your earliest memory of enjoying stickers?

Amy Loewenberg:

You know, I may be just like divulging my age again. But my very earliest memory of owning stickers has to be in grade school when all the rage were those puffy stickers and my absolute favorite ones from Hello Kitty. Of course, we all had our sticker books and whether you peel the each sticker off and stuck them on to the sheets of the book directly or you place the entire sheet of stickers into the book, without spoiling the integrity of the adhesive basically ranked how much of a sticker expert you were and I never peel them off in there. So I was an actor. I was an expert at an early age. And I honestly I wish I still had those books How about you.

Sarah Schwartz:

And when I was in third grade in the 1970s Yes, all the girls in my class were putting stickers in photo albums, the kinds that had like a sticky back and then you would put that like almost like a cellophane sheet on it. I was definitely the last to the party. And I remember being so excited to put together my own. I have no idea where mine is, but I will tell you that I never actually stuck the stickers either. So whoever comes across it will get that pleasure. Enjoy. Now that being said, Who are we having for drinks today? Me?

Amy Loewenberg:

Oh, we have some amazing guests today. Our first guest is Brittany O'Brie n, and She's the founder of Brittany Pai ge, stationery and gif company based in the New Yor City metro area. which sell greeting cards, stickers, pins candles and so much more Brittany began her career as graphic designer working fo various fashion houses in Ne York. After feeling creativel restricted in the corporat world. She started her sid hustle and turned into business in 2018. With just si card designs, Brittany Pai e products that's a tong e twister. Brittany Paige prod cts are now in over 200 retai ers including Macy's and express her illustrated and hand lett red goods aim to create witty and empowered messaging for the unapologetic girl. Sh is inspired by city living, pop culture and of course, kick ass wo

Sarah Schwartz:

All right, let's hear for kick ass women. Yeah. I actually got acquainted with Brittany at the last trade show that I actually physically attended NY NOW in February 2020. I visited her booth, I took a ton of photos, I chatted her up between sales. And then months later, I got interviewed for a glamour article on stickers. The writer was really interested in sticker collecting communities that were kind of springing up. And I made sure to tell her about all the makers that I was seeing that reclaiming the medium as their own. And I sent her to Brittany site while we chatted and I was so thrilled that her work ended up kicking off the article.

Amy Loewenberg:

Yeah, it was a really great article, by the way.

Sarah Schwartz:

I mean, it was it's exciting as someone who's covered stationery for years and the writer Rachel, I hope I pronounce her last name right but Basile do so she was really good and just brought such a thoughtful perspective to the subject. And it's something that I've always wanted to see in the consumer press. And I never have so it's really exciting to start seeing it.

Amy Loewenberg:

It was a very easy read. And well, congratulations on being quoted in that as well. Thanks. Yeah, I'm gonna go into our second guest. Now, who is another amazing woman, another amazing kick ass woman. Her name is Jennifer Luna of Paper Luxe. And Jennifer has a resume that spans her early years of being literally stationery obsessed and very supported and inspired by her artist grandmother, to working at the famed William Morris Agency to being hit by the entertainment bog and actually becoming a personal assistant for celebrities such as Scarlett Johansson and Melissa Etheridge. Wow,

Sarah Schwartz:

a lot of good stories out that. Meanwhile, her love of all things paper in office led her in 2012 to start an e commerce shop with her mom, Laurie. After a year they rented a small retail space added their favorite greeting card lines and rebranded to paper Luke's the store has become a beloved and neighborhood greeting card and gift shop in the Tacoma Washington area. Then, in 2018, they opened the curious bear toy and bookshop, offering curated quality toys and books. And in the middle of the pandemic, they completely lost their marbles and open their third shop in between the two called the crust home, providing gifts and goods for your home.

Amy Loewenberg:

And we hear that there's a Peppa second paper Luxe location and a baby boutique that are on the agenda for later in 2021. So that's a great growth that we're going to be able to get to chart and I think we should just get started with our first guest, Brittany,

Sarah Schwartz:

bring her on. Brittany, you have said that your mission with your illustrated and hand lettered goods is to quote create witty and empowered messaging for the unapologetic girl and laughing along with your recent releases. your new home card, for example, illustrates keys on a key fob reading congrats on your overpriced apartment. I can't help but feel that when reality is lacking as it is so often these days, you're going to get a laugh out of that reality no matter how grim it might be. So with that being said, which of your stickers tend to be your biggest bestsellers these days? And why do you think that is? Yeah, so

Brittany O'Brien:

I mean, I think I definitely just have to like comment on the dark sense of humor, because I use humor to combat pretty much all things in my life on whether it's outrageous things such as, you know, like online dating and the horrors that come with that or if it's renting an expensive apartment in New York City, or even darker things such as like this past election year or the global pandemic and obviously, dark humor has to be used within reason. But I just think that it is very relatable and it leaves a chuckle with people and they think that they're just kind of craving the same but with that said, I You know, for our best selling stickers, we have a few styles. And I would I a couple months ago, I would have not been able to say this one, but it really has just been blown blown away. Our Bernie Sanders stickers. So

Sarah Schwartz:

I gotta pull up your site so I can see it

Amy Loewenberg:

love that one.

Brittany O'Brien:

So we have an I tried to react to a lot of like current, like pop culture things. And you know, on Inauguration Day, we had our Bernie Sanders meme go viral of him just being like, Bernie Sanders. And, you know, within 48 hours, I created a sticker for that, and I captured it underneath it mood. And it just it really just like took off. We've sold over like 8000 units of that between my website and between wholesale accounts. And it has just been like, going like going viral. I mean, it does kind of like go back to like the dark humor. Just because it's like, you know, I mean, Bernie is great, but he was just like, you he was just in such a such a mood to be honest. And I just think that so many people related to that, right? They were just like, yes, like that is me when I wake up and have to like go on this zoom call. And like, yes, that is me when it's been snowing for six days straight. And I just think they really related to that. But other other bestsellers that we have our you know, we have a golden girl sticker which has like the four women on it, and it says girl gang underneath that and that one over this past year has just been going selling like crazy. And I think you know, the reason for that is a lot of millennial women who are like, that's my customer base. We're just feeling this like state of nostalgia, like we're just wanting simpler, older times that make us just smile. And I think Golden Girls represents that. I think like, you know, we watch that with our moms growing up, or, you know, we watch the reruns of that. And I just think that our generation is in the state of disorder. You're not just seeing it with stationery, you're seeing it with vinyl records, you're seeing it with beauty and jewelry and accessories. And I think it just you know, it brings it brings a smile to everyone's faces, right? I mean, I

Sarah Schwartz:

love the mood sticker. And I think it is really important that you put the word mood on it. Like I've seen a lot of you know, obviously I've seen a lot of this Bernie product from the pose for lack of a better term pop up in, you know, since the inauguration, and I just like, I think the fact that you put in mood like really, you know, positions it apart and you know, kind of does speak to that millennial mindset. It's interesting to hear you talk about the millennial mindset as a Gen X or who, you know, I was, like a latchkey kid like the on I think amongst my generation, that it's just like, you know, we just sort of pretend we're in our houses after school for mom and dad to come home as we run our lives. So it's very similar and maybe as a Gen X, or that's why your product speaks to me as well.

Amy Loewenberg:

I think they speak to all ages to be frank.

Brittany O'Brien:

Yeah, I mean, we definitely like we sell stickers to younger girls. And you know, boys too, but obviously, a lot of my products are very feminine, and they are for for girls, or women. But we sell stickers to you know, I have a unicorn sticker. And that one does really great. We have a lot of like food ones that are just fun. And then you know, we we also sell to to older women as well. And I think you know, that's my favorite thing. You know, back in the day when I used to able to go to markets and craft shows, it was so much fun seeing like a mom or grandma and a grandpa, you know, and a little daughter there and like they kind of have something for everyone. And I do think that it we do have like a wide variety available

Amy Loewenberg:

100% What's lovely about your line too is that your your brand is very fluid, no matter what product is that you're putting your messaging on. Right? So greeting cards and stickers like it all it all has that same flow, which means I hope for your case there you're doing multiple sales, because if they all support each other.

Brittany O'Brien:

Yeah, for sure. I mean, I think it's for me, it was very important to have like a very cohesive hand. And like as an illustrator, I wanted everything. Why don't you be able to look at it and like, not know that it was know that it was mine without like reading that it was mine, right? Like I wanted, like aesthetically for it to all look the same. And also like the messaging, right? Like, everything is humorous. Like everything has that like sassiness to it. And also like empowering and there's that like unapologetic like vibe, right? Like a girl who speaks her mind. And that was very important to me.

Amy Loewenberg:

Yeah, well, it kind of leads into my questions because you know, sending a card is a person to person messaging unit, whereas stickers convey a message to all that see them. Right. And they as you mentioned, they're like a cultural accessory and they've been they've been an accessory for decades now and they appeal To all ages, from kids to boomers and you know, pretty dazzling everything from notebooks to like walking down the street in Manhattan, they're all over the lampposts and some of them are really graphic. And some of them are just really like design oriented and silly. They're on suitcases, but they've even like, permeated into, like luxury lines, like Calvin Klein and coach have created stickers in their likeness, you know. So we all we all love them. So, so share with us a little bit more about like, what your philosophy is on why we're so drawn to stickers. And why this form of messaging is it's so important for us to have especially now,

Brittany O'Brien:

of course, yes. So we have seen a pretty big jump in sticker sales over I would say, the last two years, and we've really leaned into that part of my business. They are probably our second best selling category, right after greeting cards, but it's so it's very interesting to kind of look at that on the other end of it and being like, so why, like, why are they selling so well? And, you know, why does the five year old put unicorn stickers on her diary? And, you know, why does the teenager put it on her water bottle? Because that's like a total trend right now. And you know, why does like a 35 year old put the I voted sticker on her like work laptop or whatnot. And you know, I think it's just that stickers are a fun way to celebrate the things that you love. And regardless of your age, right, so when you're young things that are just pretty and cute and glittery. That's just like a fun thing to play with. Like I remember like playing with, like my sticker book and having anxiety about never actually putting the sticker down on the sticker book. I think a lot of people experience but I think like, you know, for millennial women, which is, as I mentioned, my customer base, we're finding this like new adult friendly way to be able to like come back to stickers and like, you know, kind of go back and click the histologia things of being able to access stickers again, in like this adult friendly way. And I think with everything going on, like we're kind of entitled to do that, like we're allowed to do that. But again, I think it's just a way to express what we value. And I think we can value a variety of things. So we can value fun and silly things such as I don't know, a pineapple with sunglasses on it, or a pizza slice that says like my one true love. But then we can also value more serious things such as a charity, or an organization that we value, our political affiliation or a brand that we really like, you know, you mentioned Calvin Klein. And I think, you know, if you look at like a water bottle, or you look at a laptop or suitcase, like all those stickers, they kind of tell a story and they they're able to tell you a lot about a person. That's pretty neat. I think that's like, you know, that's what stickers are able to do

Amy Loewenberg:

is pretty neat. That's just a great way to say it. It's just it's pretty neat that with like one little image, we're actually portraying a part of who we are and like presenting our uniqueness to anybody who wants to see.

Brittany O'Brien:

Yeah, I mean, I like I think about like my customers who like tag me on Instagram of their laptops or their water bottles. And you know, it's not always all my stickers. Like it's sometimes like one or two of mine, but then there's like the save the turtle sticker, right? Like, there's, you know, maybe like a Biden Harris 2020 sticker that I didn't create, and it's just like, it's very cool, because you're able to see what's important to people. And also just like stickers are fun, you know, like, I think we're entitled to a little bit of fun these days and

Amy Loewenberg:

we are we really are

Brittany O'Brien:

a fun thing to do. And I think you you know, as you mentioned, there's so many places that you can stick them and it's just a lot of fun. Yeah,

Amy Loewenberg:

I have to admit I've got two or three on my laptop.

Sarah Schwartz:

I mean, I used to in there when I first got into covering stationery in the late 90s I used to say greeting cards are like the billboards of the American psyche. Now it's more like stickers and you just sort of mix and match you know how you choose to present yourself and really brands yourself in in many ways. So it's it's really cool to see and I'm sure when you see you know consumers picking one a few from you and a few from another range that speak to you. I mean it's the blend that really expresses themselves that they take a few from here and a few from there and you know, who knows. So our last question for you today is has COVID has Coronavirus changed how you see stationery and if so how? So

Brittany O'Brien:

I just think that I have an even greater appreciation and I guess gratitude for others since the pandemic hit which is what nearing a year now and like a couple of days right like that is so surreal um but I think it you know, it just like for people like close in my life I have a greater appreciation for and for you know, even like a little bit farther out there. out there, whether it's acquaintances or strangers. And I just think that sending stationery and gift items is a way to show kindness to others, especially when you can't necessarily see those people as often in person anymore. So I know personally, when everything kind of started happening about a year ago, I had this like feeling of helplessness. And I think that others felt that same way, right? So I was working from home, I didn't really have to leave my apartment. And a lot of my friends and family didn't have to do that either. And while we were doing our part by staying home, we also kind of found ourselves asking, like, what else can I do. And of course, you can donate to organizations you donate to charities and whatnot. But a kind of like more personalized thing that I found to be helpful was like sending statements sending letters and sending care packages to the people who I love. And I was sending that to a lot of like my elderly aunts, and uncles, and if they were like care packages that have hammered in greeting cards, and then my cards, and then I also supported a bunch of small businesses too, and got like small gift items of candles, or puzzles and, and things also in this stationery community. But then I also heard of a lot of people outside of the stationery community doing the same thing, right, but writing letters to nurses or essential workers on sending care packages to doctors. And I just think that, you know, during like, such an isolating time, it helps combat that feeling of helplessness. And I think just, you know, to kind of circle back to the initial question of how it changed how it stationary just, it's given me such a greater appreciation for it small businesses and also Stationers as well.

Sarah Schwartz:

I would tend to agree. I mean, when I get a letter, now, it's very different. It's a very different experience than the four times for lack of a better term, it's just much more meaningful, just the fact that I'm getting and have this object, it just means it's just as a total different meaning.

Amy Loewenberg:

Yeah, absolutely. I agree completely. And I think it's it's catapulted me into actually buying more stamps and sending more cards. I think that I always did. You know, I was one of those people that sent birthday cards. But now I'm sending like everyday cards, and just thinking of you cards, and all that, that's amplified. And what I love just to do a little full circle here is throwing a sticker inside, because there are also little gifts that you get to send people in the mail. And so it's not just the excitement of opening that envelope and seeing that really cool card, but then all of a sudden you open it up and like the sticker pops out. And it's you know, Bernie, oh my god. funny is that,

Brittany O'Brien:

yeah, and I think also, like, you know, times are tough right now. And money is tight for a lot of people. And this is like, an inexpensive way to do that. Right? Like, it's a $5 card or a $3 sticker. Like you're not sending someone like, you know, hundreds of dollars worth of stuff. And it's just like a nice little fun thing. And you know, it's so much fun to get something in the mail, right? You're like, Oh, this person was thinking of me, this person knows I love Bernie Sanders. So they sent me this funny little sticker and

Amy Loewenberg:

Golden Girls.

Brittany O'Brien:

Yea they can be a golden girl sticker, right? Like, whatever, whatever it is. And I think it just, you know, just bringing joy to people's lives. And I think we can all use a little bit more joy these days.

Amy Loewenberg:

Well, Brittany, I have to say you are definitely bringing joy to people's lives. So let us formally say thank you for doing that. Because you do it so well. And your style is is just so poignant. And and I love the fact that you can turn something around so quickly to take advantage of these cultural clues and and really not only impact your business, but you're impacting somebody's life in in real time. So congratulations to you on that.

Brittany O'Brien:

Well, thank you very much. And thank you for having me. It's always so much fun to be able to do these things. So thank you.

Sarah Schwartz:

We really appreciate it. Cheers.

Amy Loewenberg:

Cheers. Cheers.

Sarah Schwartz:

I love talking with that girl. Time to top off our drinks and hear from our next guest, Jennifer.

Amy Loewenberg:

So welcome, Jennifer. Cheers. Cheers. Cheers. So let's just jump right in. Okay, sending a card is a person to person message. Usually, stickers, however, are tiny purveyors of messaging to all that see them. They've been a cultural accessory for decades, appealing to all ages and generations, from preschoolers to boomers. And everything is getting dazzled notebooks, water bottles, lampposts, suitcases, your cell phone. I mean, the list just goes on and on and on. They've even fallen into luxury lines. So we all seem to love them. So share with us what your philosophy is on why we're all drawn to sticke rs and why this form of messaging is so important for us to have. And I always ask more than one question at a time. Do we know that you've got stickers in several of your stores, but will you have stickers. In all of your stories, even your new concept to the crest home?

Jennifer Luna:

Yeah, it's such a great question. And such a great product format that we've seen really take off in the last few years. First and foremost, I think they appeal to people because they're a form of self expression. You can say a lot about yourself with one simple sticker without, you know, standing up and shouting what your beliefs are. So for the people that just want to, you know, make sure people know where they're from, like if it's a local sticker. Or if you're a big office fan, or shits Creek fan, if you're a Biden fan, or a Trump fan, you know, it can say a lot in one little sticker. So I think self expression is just such a healthy form of expression for people. And people just really love to say who they are subtly, sometimes. So that's important. I do think that we will carry stickers in all of our stores we currently do now, kind of the difference just appeals to different people in our toy store. We obviously have kids stickers, which was kind of a new addition for us this year, we weren't really sure if people would spend you know, 234 dollars on a sticker for a kid's water bottle. We were completely shocked and surprised people will spend $50, they'll grab a sticker, like a whole handful of stickers at once just for their child. So that's really, really fun to see. In the crest, which is more of a home decor store. We carry kind of stickers that go with like plants, or certain designers, a little pop culture thrown in.

Amy Loewenberg:

So we're here at ribbon items. Absolutely.

Jennifer Luna:

Yeah, and in paper Lux, we sell all kinds of stickers. I think our most popular are local stickers that say you know, Tacoma, Washington or for crafts where we're specifically located or Washington State. Pop Culture is probably our number one selling kind of line of stickers. The Office shits Creek lizzo I mean, you name it, we have a sticker for it. And people love it.

Amy Loewenberg:

Yeah, I know. Sarah is gonna talk to you a little bit more about the popular ones. Yeah, terms of like grabbing handles. Like I tell you myself, like just walking into a store. I'm so drawn not only for the stickers I want for myself, but for all the gifts that I want to give other people because there's absolutely no way and they they resonate just so deeply in this really quick manner. It's so exciting.

Jennifer Luna:

Yeah, we we find it in both ways. People are buying it for themselves, you know for their water bottle their laptop, their car, but then we see people buying and by the handful. Oh my friend Susan will love this one or my dad will think this is hysterical. And they buy handfuls of them and they send them in cards, or they add them we saw at Christmas time. It was like one of the top stocking stuffers, people would put them in, especially like their teenagers or their college age students, stockings, people were mailing them left and right. It's kind of when you see one that resonates with like a friend, you go, Oh, they would really like this. And it you know, they pop in a card and send to them. And I think it's so simple, but it's like I saw this and thought of you. I mean, isn't that a form of flattery when somebody sends you something specific to you and I think has a lot to do with greeting cards as well. But it's fun to get it in the mail and say, oh, someone really thought about me and knew my love of like murder podcast, just another segment that's been really big and surprising. So it's fun. Hey,

Amy Loewenberg:

let me ask you a little bit of a surprising question here. But you have several different types of stores and you've got a whole bunch of stickers I mean, I don't know the quantity of your assortment but based on what I saw online It was pretty deep. Yeah. How are you finding displaying them working for you? I know that people have walls people edition what what seems to be working for you for the retailer that wants to jump in and and you know get into the sticker fad. If they're not in there already trend, a trend. It's not a fad. It's a trend.

Jennifer Luna:

It's not it's a trend. I think it's around for the long haul. Honestly, we've been selling stickers since we opened I'd say a solid seven or eight years, but definitely an uptick. In the last year or two the displays has been a challenge. I met some other retailer groups and we always have this conversation. How are you displaying your stickers, they just get all messy. But we found some really creative ways with some various different tabletop kind of displays that have dividers. And then my favorite one is by actually a local company here really great companies stickers Northwest. They're actually a fairly large sticker brand now. They have a big large floor spinner and it was kind of at first we were like we really buy a floor spinner for just stickers. But we made the jump and when we did it, it blew us away how well it made the sticker sell it kept them looking nice and organized. People then can see them so much better that they'll grab multiples like we were talking about in handfuls. So I think you have to be really creative some we just have a little bowl in a section of this store that matches whatever we're displaying. In that part, we kind of have them all throughout the store. But up front, in a big display, you wouldn't believe how many people are drawn to it and stand there and you hear him laughing about it and you know, finding their favorites. So it's a challenge. But there's, there's definitely ways to do.

Sarah Schwartz:

So. I definitely think it's very smart that you, you know, set up a dedicated display and display area, especially because you say that you've survived that most customers can't just stop at one. Do you find that they go across categories? And I mean, obviously, your different stores might focus on like, sort of different themes. But Will someone buy a girl empowerment sticker at the same time as like a sticker, obviously, for their child? Or do they sort of go across categories?

Jennifer Luna:

Yeah, they definitely cross categories, because I like people buy them for themselves. And they might stay kind of in the same, same genre. But then they start seeing ones for everybody they know. And it's such an easy and accessible item at you know, from two to $5 each, that they're grab one for their friends and their family. And we get a good chuckle out of when we're checking people out. And they bring us this stack of stickers, and you'll have such an assortment across the board. And so you really see it all over the place all across the board, what people are buying,

Sarah Schwartz:

that's awesome. And then I wonder if you're planning on introducing anything to sort of encourage these multiple sales like a like a frequent sticker buyer card, like buy 10 get through free, that type of thing?

Jennifer Luna:

Absolutely. We've thought about that we just implemented a new loyalty program. And so we're trying to find creative ways to increase that. That number of purchase. Same with greeting cards, stickers, I don't know that you really need to encourage people too much. They just see the stickers and they can't help themselves. But I think anytime you can do that, it's kind of a win win for everybody. you encourage them to buy more and they feel like they're being, you know, taken care of by getting you know, buy five, get one free. So definitely something we're looking into. All right, great. Well, we really have one more question for you that we ask all of our guests. And that is has Coronavirus, changed how you see stationery and if so how COVID hit we we really had no idea what that meant for anything. And I have to say, it's just it's been mind blowing how much it has reaffirmed my love of stationery and what we do, we've seen a number of cards that we so explode. You know anybody who tries to tell me that stationery is good or kids don't send cards anymore, I would like to show them my sales reports because that's just completely not the case. I we see customers come and buy. And they do it in the store and they buy it online, they'll buy 100 to $200 worth of greeting cards in one time. Love says they just love the written word. And we're seeing a lot of the younger generations to millennials, and even some Gen Z years I have a couple teenagers. They love writing letters to their friends, especially during COVID because they can't actually see them. But then they get into it because then they can use their fancy fun pens and the stickers and all the different fun things that go with it. So I think slowing down during COVID gave some people some time to actually dive into that a little bit more. And it's really, it's been really fun to see the through the generations, you know, from my teenagers to the little 90 year old ladies who still come and buy $200 worth of cards every, you know, month so they can send to everyone they know. So I think COVID has benefited us in that sense, obviously not in every sense, but I hope it stays around, I really truly do think it stays around. And that falls on some people like us who are stationary, you know, stewards to keep that alive. So I agree.

Amy Loewenberg:

I also think just as you know, the cultural signals get louder and louder the development of product changes on at a faster pace and, and then again resonates with the demographic of no matter what age they are. So I agree, I kind of think that you know, letter writing is here to stay. It's just a matter of how embedded it is in in the younger generations. And I feel like with all these incredible crazy cool designs coming out and these crazy cool stories like your your your own. It's kind of hard not to embellish upon that, that the act of writing a card. So this has been really, really fun. And before we end Jennifer what what's the best way for people to reach out to you? Yeah, absolutely. Thanks

Jennifer Luna:

so much for having me. You can find our main store paper Luxe at paper Luxe. shop on Instagram and kind of follow through our other stores from there. And if you're ever in the Tacoma Washington area definitely stop in or you can be sure we will. I would like to very much. We'd love to have you.

Amy Loewenberg:

So with again, we say thank you and we hope to see you soon. Just keep going and keep doing what you're doing and cheers, cheers.

Sarah Schwartz:

Cheers. Well, that was fun. Brittany and Jennifer, thank you again for joining us for chat and cocktails. Amy, what are you drinking this evening?

Amy Loewenberg:

Well, it is no secret that I've become a complete paper playing cocktail fan. I am enjoying the bourbon Amaro apple and lemon juice combination it is more than delicious. It is so easy to make the whole act of using my cocktail shaker and I am really having fun making my tiny paper plane garnishes. And I would love to see more people doing that How about you?

Sarah Schwartz:

I am having a real actual paper planes cocktail as well. Which means baout to go to bed but hopefully before then, I will get in this reminder please don't forget to post Instagram pics of your paper plane comm using the hashtag the paper plane podcast and paper plane cocktail hour. Don't miss out and Amy where can our listeners find you in the meantime,

Amy Loewenberg:

you can always connect with me on [email protected] ny and oh w that's Amy at New York now LinkedIn or email me at work. I always want to highlight our amazing community on my New York now spotlight podcast and I love featuring you guys on my Instagram store tours, stories. I'm always available to help connect you to new and needed resources and answer any of your New York now market or digital market questions. And how can we connect with you Sarah?

Sarah Schwartz:

Probably the best place to find me is at the paper nerd comm you can see more fabulous stationery coverage, check out my podcast, the paper fold and also access stationary trends, the industry's award winning design driven trades quarterly as well. It's always a pleasure to learn more about makers and spotlight their work, whether it's in a publication, a blog, or a podcast. If you want to connect, I'd love to hear from you.

Amy Loewenberg:

Yeah, please don't hesitate to reach out to either of us with your comments, questions, feedback suggestions for guests, or really just to say hi and introduce yourself. And with that we say cheers.